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  1. #11
    Valerie's Avatar
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    my wife would not mind at all.

    My husband, on the other hand, might take issue.
    "So I am turning over a new leaf but the page is stuck". Diane Arbus

  2. #12
    sly
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    Valerie, I was just about to mention my husband, when your reply popped up.
    He's the chief dish washer, so he's in charge. He might also be wondering why I'm not using the perfectly usable darkroom he built me.

  3. #13

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    My wife wouldn't kill me. But if I generated a lot of respiratory irritants in the house it might be the other way around. Asthma can be fatal.

    But ultimately, what I would or would not do is not really relevant - people do lots of things I would not 8-)
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  4. #14
    Ian Leake's Avatar
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    In the grand scheme of things the common Pt/Pd chemicals are not particularly bad, except for the contrast control agents.

    The common contrast control agents (potassium chlorate, dichromates) are highly toxic and carcinogenic. I'm not sure about the toxicity of 'Na2'.

    Platinum is toxic but not life-threatening. It can cause respiratory problems (as noted earlier in the thread). If you Google 'Potassium Chloroplatinite' you'll find a reference to someone who tried to commit suicide by drinking some. They failed.

    The commonly used clearing agents are not particularly toxic in the quantities we use.

    Having said all that, it is far, far better to keep photographic chemicals out of the kitchen.

  5. #15
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    oxcalates don't like humans very much. not sure how much is in
    the oxalic developer used to developer pt/pd prints
    but its not a fun way to die ...
    Oxalates are common in nature. We regularly have it in our kitchens as it is an ingredient in Spinache and Rhubarb, but also in Cocoa. We also use it at home as ingredient in special washing agents.


    I assume the greatest threat in the kitchen to be Salmonella.


    Though I would advice a darkoom novice to keep out of the kitchen for principle reasons.
    Last edited by AgX; 05-17-2014 at 04:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    AgX
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    On the other hand it makes not much sense to ban all photographic activity from the kitchen, but then to put photo chemicals in beverage bottles and place them somewhere in the house.

  7. #17
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    She hasn't yet.

    I do all my B&W developing in the kitchen. I also use the microwave for bringing chemicals that have been refrigerated up to room temp. I use my own containers, jugs, spoons, washing up cloths etc (which are stored in the darkroom between use), clean everything up thoroughly before and afterwards, and don't work while the kitchen is being used for cooking. I also never leave chemicals out while I am not present - everything gets cleaned up properly and all the chemicals put away before I leave the room.

    Nice video BTW.
    Last edited by andrew.roos; 05-17-2014 at 06:15 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Oxalates are common in nature. We regularly have it in our kitchens as it is an ingredient in Spinache and Rhubarb, but also in Cocoa. We also use it at home as ingredient in special washing agents.


    I assume the greatest threat in the kitchen to be Salmonella.


    Though I would advice a darkoom novice to keep out of the kitchen for principle reasons.
    yup,
    but if you eat rhubarb leaves which are high in oxalates
    (from what i understand and it might be wrong )
    it leeches the calcium from your bones and leaves
    you a quivering mess on the floor ...
    maybe that's how they get bone-less chickens at the ranch ?

  9. #19

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    No. I have one set of cabinets under the microwave, and she and the cat know that everything that's related to B&W film developing goes under there. The cat is only interested in the pantry door, and seems to go in there now and then at night to check on her food cans and bags, but she's unpredictable, so I have the film cabinet door fixed so that she can't paw it open and go exploring.

    All the enlarger and print related stuff is in one of the bathrooms, and the cameras are in a dresser drawer. The negs folder is on the kitchen table.... A full darkroom would really be nice.
    Last edited by momus; 05-17-2014 at 01:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    My darkroom is in the basement, and I share water source with the laundry area. I develop film and wash prints in the utility sink there.

    We have three cats, so I thoroughly clean the area after each use, using tray cleaner or Permawash on spots of chemicals, and then wash the sink down and mop the floor. I don't think it's actually necessary because I'm very careful when I work, but it helps keep the place tidy and sanitary.

    I would not use photography chemicals in the kitchen. If not for health reasons, then at least for peace of mind.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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