Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,531   Posts: 1,572,596   Online: 1113
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    38

    Contact Printing History?

    Hi, looking to the group here for some input and direction.

    I am developing a paper on large format (LF) contact printing.

    Can you help point me to some of the most notable LF contact printers? e.g., Edward Weston, Fred Picker?

    I am also trying to quantify "why" LF contact prints are considered so special. Thoughts on this and any pointers to literature?

    Looking forward to learning more about this.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    darkosaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,979
    I would say your question is also connected with history of enlargers. Before small formats everything was contact printed.

    Take a look on:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20110714.../enlargers.htm

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,215
    Are you focusing on any particular type of contact print - traditional silver-gelatin vs alternative processes?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    38
    Brian, ideally I would like to cover both historic (e.g, Salt, and the other POP prints) and the more modern AZO and gelatin silver contact prints. It can be tricky because the relationship between the medium and process can be intertwined.

    My goal is to first identify notable photographers in history that were advocates and/or contact printed exclusively. I want to go view their prints in person at museums. I haven't done the research yet, but I think Edward Weston would be a possible example of a large format contact printer. I understand that photographers that were working prior to enlargements would have been contact printers, however, I would still want to know about any that are critically acclaimed.

    The second part of my research I want to try and capture with words, if possible, why some people, possibly even collectors and/or curators hold contact prints in high regard. What makes them unique, magical, special, etc. I want to try and quantify to the best of my ability in words the unique characteristics.

    Thank you.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    38
    Hi, yes, I agree. I think that in itself is a clue on the timeline of contact printing photographers. In my mind, I was making a distinction between contact prints via any medium (glass, paper, film) and enlargements as we know them today via film and contemporary enlargers. This can be very tricky as pointed out in your link that you shared. I think it is best that I am very clear about the distinction noted above. Thanks for making me think about this more deeply.


    Quote Originally Posted by darkosaric View Post
    I would say your question is also connected with history of enlargers. Before small formats everything was contact printed.

    Take a look on:

    https://web.archive.org/web/20110714.../enlargers.htm

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,215
    You're embarking on a sizable task. Any book on the history of photography would get you started. As mentioned earlier, prior to the advent of enlargers contract printing was the primary method. And if they are in the history book you can safely assume that they are "notable". After that era you need to discern between contact printing and projection printing. I'm glad to hear that you interested in museum viewing... that is very, very instructive.
    Last edited by BrianShaw; 11-13-2014 at 12:16 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: used wrong term; corrected that.

  7. #7
    dpurdy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Portland OR USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,064
    Images
    38
    My Grandmother born in 1894 got a job as a girl in a photo lab. I have her contact printing frame. It is a beautiful wooden frame with approx 5x5 window for the print. The glass is broken in the window but it is from a day when all prints were contacted.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    38
    Indeed the task is bigger than myself... your comments and feedback and very helpful. Thanks.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    38
    That is an impressive family piece of history to have. Really love to hear things like this. Thanks for sharing.



    Quote Originally Posted by dpurdy View Post
    My Grandmother born in 1894 got a job as a girl in a photo lab. I have her contact printing frame. It is a beautiful wooden frame with approx 5x5 window for the print. The glass is broken in the window but it is from a day when all prints were contacted.

  10. #10
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,570
    Images
    343
    Eugene Atget.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin