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  1. #1

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    Selenium toning... almost no change

    Have a bunch of prints I put in selenium trying to get a lot more change than normal. Mixed the selenium 1 to 20 and put the prints in. Very little change. Left them in with agitation for 20 minutes. Very little change. A bit cold toned but no reddish or warming at all.

    The prints were all developed in Michael A. Smiths' amidol and fixed in a non hardening fixer. They didn't change enough to tell and certainly not the warmth I was looking for. Guess I will have to go another direction & bleach & redevelop in sepia to get closer to what I want.

    Anyone know why they don't change tone much at all with such a strong solution of selenium & the long time in the bath?

  2. #2

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    What sort of paper and selenium toner are you using? Different papers respond differently to toners. Typically, warmtone (chlorobromide) emulsions respond fairly well to selenium toning although you need fairly 'high' concentrations to effect a strong colour change. Assuming KRST you could try dilutions of 1+9 or even 1+3. Diluted 1+20 KRST is fairly dilute and some papers (eg Ilford MGIV) won't show much of a change.

    Regards,
    Roger.

  3. #3
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Assuming you are using Azo, your results are not unexpected. There's an easier way to get more warmth - just add more potassium bromide to your amidol. Michael and Paula have reported they use double the amount that they used to with the latest run of Azo. That would make it about 4 ml KBr per liter amidol. I've found the same thing and normally use 4 or 5 ml of KBr.
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  4. #4

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    I am using Kodak Azo and these prints were all on grade 2. I was already using double the amount of Bromide for a bit of warmth. Soft water for working solutions and no hardening fix.

    I was surprised the Kodak Selenium toner at this strength didn't 'take off' with the Azo. At this strength I get a major tone change with Ilford and it is way too strong for the Forte or Bergger papers I use.

    So, will try the old sepia toner & see how it does.

  5. #5
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    I find it interesting that you didn't have a change with Azo. I just finished a series of tests with selenium on Ilford MG, Agfa 111, and Azo grade 3 at 5 and 10 minutes. At 75ml toner per liter of water I got no change in the Ilford, slight change in the Agfa, and red tones in the Azo. At 150mL per liter of water I got a complete reddish brown tone in the Azo, an eggplant on the Agfa, and a neutral tone on the Ilford. These are pretty strong dilutions for selenium. I will have to try the grade 2 and see how the results differ.

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  6. #6

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    Try dilution 1:5.
    sergio caetano

  7. #7
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WarEaglemtn
    I am using Kodak Azo and these prints were all on grade 2. I was already using double the amount of Bromide for a bit of warmth. Soft water for working solutions and no hardening fix.
    Yep, the new grade 2 doesn't shift very much with selenium. Grade 3 does much better. You can still add more bromide to the amidol before going the sepia route. All in all, grade 2 is neutral to cold in tone.
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  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    If you want the purple-brown shift, try Azo grade 2 in a developer like Agfa Neutol WA. You'll hit Dmax in a few minutes and then it will flip to purple-brown. With a non-hardening acid rapid fixer (I used Zonal Pro), I found the change occurred at 3-4 minutes in KRST 1:15. In TF-4, it flipped at 1-1.5 minutes.
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  9. #9

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    I have used the new AZO G-3, Developed fully in Amidol, then toned in Kodak selenium 1:9, and my prints split toned blue/red after about 3 minutes. Before the 3 minutes, it slighty took away the greenish cast from the Bromide, but when it finally split toned..it happened in a a matter of SECONDS.

  10. #10

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    I'm not familiar with AZO.
    One thing to be careful is fixing. Prints for toning should be fully fixed, but not over fixed. If the print is over fixed it will not react with selenium.

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