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  1. #11
    Digidurst's Avatar
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    Thanks for your encouragement, Ryan! And thank you for not bashing my digital negatives. I was hesitant to mention it at all but I also wanted to be honest about my method. The last thing I want to do is offend fellow APUGers!
    Anyway, I am really enjoying working with AZO and I am psyched to try more images with it. I uploaded my first AZO print in the experimental gallery for anyone who would like to take a look. Standard disclaimer: the scan doesn't do the print justice.
    Oh, and boy does AZO curl! I ironed my final print and stuck it between the pages of a thick book to cool. Came out flat as a pancake, thank goodness, but I'm not real sure what I'll do with a larger (than 4x6) print! Anybody got a cheap press they want to get rid of?

    Oh shoot, I forgot... I do intend to try Amidol in the near future as I'd like to experiment with that water bath technique. However, the cool tones of the Edwald UB are not unpleasant in the least

  2. #12

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    If you dry the Azo face down on a screen at moderately cool temperatures it dries pretty flat.

  3. #13

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    You can get the cool blue tone with Amidol too, but you will get better blacks and really a sharper image. I know that sounds weird, but I went thru my old AZO prints and found some that were developed in Edwal UB, and when comparing the same print to one dveloped in Amidol... the blacks are stronger, and there seems to be better separation in the tones (In result, making the print look sharper.) When compairing the prints, the EUB prints seems to have a dusty charcoal look to them. You cannot really notice what im talking about until you can compair it to another one of your images developed in Amidol.

    Make sure you squeegy your prints before laying them face down to dry. If they dry in a cool area, they will dry flater.

    Best of luck,

    Ryan McIntosh

  4. #14

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    I dry Azo face down on screens without using a squeegy - never any problems with curling. I've ruined a few prints in the past by dragging a squeegy across them and see no downside to this method. (Darkroom always at 68 degrees).
    Scott Killian
    www.scottkillian.com

  5. #15
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Congrats Digidurst and keep at it.

    If you're not ready to make the jump to Amidol yet, another developer you can try is Agfa Neutol WA. Several of us, including myself, use it for proofing Azo. Some use it exlusively. It has some waterbath capability, although not as strong in that regard as amidol.

    I dry my prints face down on screens. I squeegee them most of the time, but not always. Why not advertise in the APUG classifieds for a dry mount press? It makes the flattening and mounting a whole lot less work. Does a better job at it too.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  6. #16
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    Why not advertise in the APUG classifieds for a dry mount press?
    I intend to steer clear of used presses. This is because I cannot be certain that the previous owner(s) didn't use the press to flatten or mount prints either fixed in ammonium fixers and/or prints which were improperly or incompletely washed. Only a new press guarantees uncontaminated platens. I will only put truly archivally processed prints in it.

  7. #17
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    I intend to steer clear of used presses. This is because I cannot be certain that the previous owner(s) didn't use the press to flatten or mount prints either fixed in ammonium fixers and/or prints which were improperly or incompletely washed. Only a new press guarantees uncontaminated platens. I will only put truly archivally processed prints in it.
    That's a point to remember Jim. But platens can be cleaned and I wouldn't be sure that a new press is uncontaminated. Personnaly, I use a couple pieces of virgin matt board between the platens to help.

    What's wrong with ammonium fixers?
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    I intend to steer clear of used presses. This is because I cannot be certain that the previous owner(s) didn't use the press to flatten or mount prints either fixed in ammonium fixers and/or prints which were improperly or incompletely washed. Only a new press guarantees uncontaminated platens. I will only put truly archivally processed prints in it.
    Since you don't use the bare platen to mount prints residual fixer shouldn't be a factor. Even if you did you could easily clean it with a mild solution of clorox and liquid dish washing detergent.

    Don Bryant

  9. #19
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    What's wrong with ammonium fixers?
    They don't wash out as easily as pure hypo. Use a two bath sodium thiosulfate fixer regimen for maximum permanence. When processed in Permawash, selenium toned, thoroughly washed and dry mounted to Artcare Alpharag board the prints should last for many centuries.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    They don't wash out as easily as pure hypo.
    You should talk with Bill Troop...

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