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  1. #11
    mikewhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juan
    I haven't used the paper either (yet) but I have seen some of Doug's prints made on it. They remind me most of the prints I made on Zone VI Brilliant - the second edition made when Fred still owned the company. That was a bromide paper, too. The Kentmere seems to have the same contrast and print color - that's to my eye, no measurements.

    Doug and I are giving a mini-seminar on contact printing next week, so maybe I can talk him out of a little of his paper. I may even mix up some of my dwindling supply of Amidol.
    juan
    One of my favorite things about the old Zone VI paper was the paper surface and texture. The Kentmere glossy has a less textured surface to the paper. It also tends to curl much more than the Brilliant did, even though it is DW - and I mean it is curled when it comes out of the box, too. The packaging of the Kentmere is cheap - the boxes are are of thin cardboard and rip easily.

    The paper does have a DR of about 1.3 according to my tests, which is very good, and is capable of a deep black. I have printed on it some, but I have not been that happy so far, but that is probably just from lack of experience with the paper. So, far, I don't find that it is a substitute for Brilliant.

    I don't see why contact printing with this paper would require special treatment. It is going to be a lot faster than AZO, that's for sure.

    -Mike

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi

    The paper does have a DR of about 1.3 according to my tests, which is very good, and is capable of a deep black. -Mike

    That DR is for Grade two, I assume.

  3. #13
    mikewhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    That DR is for Grade two, I assume.
    Thanks for pointing that out, yes it is for Gr 2. I used a Kodak calibrated step wedge to check it and viewed the steps in normal room light. Looking at direct light from a strong light source, more steps were visible, but I think 1.3 is a reasonable DR for normal print viewing. I did not plot a curve for the paper.

    -Mike

  4. #14
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    AZO paper is virtually a pure chloride emulsion with little sensitivity outside the short blue region of the spectrum.

    Under most lighting conditions, AZO paper will be over 6 stops slower than most typical enlarging papers unless the light source has a considerable amount of blue or ultraviolet in it. If your light source is devoid of UV, AZO will show the biggest speed loss of all, but with UV you might even have a condition where AZO can match the speed of an enlarging paper. It depends on light source.

    AZO must have some unusual characteristics regarding contrast reciprocity as well. I find that those that get the best prints with the longest scale, report using the longest exposure times. This would be a dim bulb or one lacking lots of UV. When I use a short exposure time and compare AZO with other papers, it has a 'normal' curve just as reported on the EK web site.

    The bottom line is that you might find a condition with just about any good enlarging paper that can be made to match AZO, but then again maybe not. AZO certainly looks beautiful in the hands of those expert in pushing it to its limits. Why take chances when you know you can get what you want from AZO.

    PE

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    Thanks for pointing that out, yes it is for Gr 2. I used a Kodak calibrated step wedge to check it and viewed the steps in normal room light. Looking at direct light from a strong light source, more steps were visible, but I think 1.3 is a reasonable DR for normal print viewing. I did not plot a curve for the paper.

    -Mike

    That would be pretty near that of grade three Azo...I got a 1.35 on that paper.

  6. #16
    mikewhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    That would be pretty near that of grade three Azo...I got a 1.35 on that paper.
    Do you recall what you for for Gr 2 AZO? I can't recall what I got when I tried it. Plus, I have about 4 emulsions\vintages of Gr 2 AZO at home and I haven't tried them all yet.

    -Mike

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    Do you recall what you for for Gr 2 AZO? I can't recall what I got when I tried it. Plus, I have about 4 emulsions\vintages of Gr 2 AZO at home and I haven't tried them all yet.

    -Mike
    The last time I tested Grade two Azo I got a 1.65. That may have been the next to last emulsion. The new emulsion will hold 1.65-1.70

  8. #18

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    Hi Ryan,
    I'm shooting 11x14, yes I am aware that AZO is available in 20x24, this size dos not equate well for my format. I have considerd using the left over smaller pieces as a work print/test strips for each individual negative I start a printing.

    No I have not used AZO before nor have I contact printed any format above 4x5, so this is pretty new for me.

    The kentmere is going for $65.00 for 11x14 50sh and the AZO is running $230.00 20x24 50sh. So lets call the 20x24 AZO 100 sheets when cut down, the Azo is nearly twice as much.

    I'll just have to test angd try it myself to see if the price justifies it. Thanks for all the input everyone.
    Mike A
    Quote Originally Posted by McPhotoX
    What format are you shooting that is preventing you from printing on AZO? Larger then 20x24? You can purchase AZO in 20x24, and cut it down to the size that you need. The smaller pieces left over can be used for smaller negatives (8x10, 5x7 ect) or can be used as test strips for the larger prints!

    I take it that because you are shooting ultra larger format, you want the finest print quality possible. So why are you stopping when you get to making the fine print? I take it that you have used AZO before, so you know the print quality difference when compairing a AZO print to a print on enlarger paper.

    If you are wanting to make the finest prints you can get from your negatives, you should be using the right materials to print on. In this case, that would be AZO.

    Ryan McIntosh

  9. #19
    Gustavo_Castilla's Avatar
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    What developer do you use with the Kentmere Bromide paper?
    Gustavo Castilla
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  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gustavo_Castilla
    What developer do you use with the Kentmere Bromide paper?
    A person could use any of the conventional paper developers. I have heard that Amidol works well with Bromide papers. I'll probably give that combination a try this winter.

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