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  1. #1

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    Where to get contact printing frame?

    I am thinking about getting into making Digital Negatives from scanned B&W 35mm and then contact print it on traditional silver gelatin paper. Where can I get some good quality contact frame etc.?

    Thanks!

  2. #2

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    www.pellandphoto.com

    I've read good things about these, but have not used them myself (yet).
    Macy
    Just trying to be the person my dogs think I am.

    website: gallery

  3. #3
    brent8927's Avatar
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    When I was making contact prints I purchased a contact printer off ebay; it might have been made by Pelland Photo because it looks the same.

    Just curious, but why do you want to contact print on traditional silver gelatin paper? Scanning, enlarging, and then printing will just degrade your image and will cost a lot more, so I think unless you are doing the alternative processes or just really want to do contact printing, you'd be much better off just printing using an enlarger.
    In the name of God, stop a moment, close your work, look around you. ~LEO TOLSTOY

  4. #4

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    I have a contact frame from www.pellandphoto.com and they are just excellent. If I ever need another I am going to buy it from him. High quality, great craftsmanship and excellent customer service. Thumbs up all the way.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by brent8927
    ...
    Just curious, but why do you want to contact print on traditional silver gelatin paper? Scanning, enlarging, and then printing will just degrade your image and will cost a lot more, so I think unless you are doing the alternative processes or just really want to do contact printing, you'd be much better off just printing using an enlarger.
    I knew someone will ask that :-) The number 1 reason is that I don't have an enlarger right now and may be this will be a first step into yet another slippery slope :-) I do develop my own films, E-6 for a couple years, and now back to B&W, both using the Jobo. I have both a Nikon LS-4000 and the Minolta Elite 5400 so my scans should be pretty darn good. I have been printing using Epson 1280 and the MIS UT-FT2 B&W ink, but thought may be I will dip my toes back into analog printing slowly. When I was in High School many moons ago, I used the teeny bathroom as a portable darkroom. Just put the enlarger on a wooden board proped on the sink :-)

  6. #6

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    Pelland's printing frames sound very nice, but if you need to save a few bucks, here's one from Photographers' Formulary for about half the price:

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/cont...ughType=search
    "What drives man to create is the compulsion to, just once in his life, comprehend and record the pure, unadorned, unvarnished truth. Not some of it; all of it."

    - Fred Picker

  7. #7
    cjarvis's Avatar
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    I've owned a couple frames from B&S (www.bostick-sullivan.com) - an 11x14 and a 16x20. I still own and constantly use the latter. Made of ash with three sprung sections/two hinges. Sturdy and maintains good contact even with the thinnest of papers, including Bienfang 360.

  8. #8
    brent8927's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by didjiman
    I knew someone will ask that :-) The number 1 reason is that I don't have an enlarger right now and may be this will be a first step into yet another slippery slope :-) I do develop my own films, E-6 for a couple years, and now back to B&W, both using the Jobo. I have both a Nikon LS-4000 and the Minolta Elite 5400 so my scans should be pretty darn good. I have been printing using Epson 1280 and the MIS UT-FT2 B&W ink, but thought may be I will dip my toes back into analog printing slowly. When I was in High School many moons ago, I used the teeny bathroom as a portable darkroom. Just put the enlarger on a wooden board proped on the sink :-)
    That makes sense; I hope your analog printing turns out wonderful.

    Also, someone recommended a Photographer's Formulary printing frame; I bought one of theirs and I hated it; I didn't even use it once. It uses clamps instead of springs (and the clamps will hurt you a lot if you're not careful!); the Pelland Photo frame is much better and as a few people have said, just a work of art in itself; you really wont need another frame until you break it (I dropped mine and just the glass broke; the frame itself didn't crack/chip or warp at all). Well... OK, you might need another frame if you want to print bigger. What's great about the Pelland frame is that it applies pressure at the center; the Photographer's Forumarly frame only applies pressure on the sides and this can cause your paper and negative to not be in contact in the center.

    Maybe Photographer's Formulary has changed their frames since I used one, but I really hated it; but I'm sure some people like it though, otherwise they wouldn't make it!

    Anyway, if money is an issue, buy a printing frame off of Ebay; they usually show up in all kinds of different sizes; just make sure if you do go the Ebay route you ask the seller if the frame has warped at all over time.
    In the name of God, stop a moment, close your work, look around you. ~LEO TOLSTOY

  9. #9

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    Another thought: it would be interesting to hear about your light source, and your setup. I have long used a contact frame for my 8x10s, but since soem time I use another light setup in which UV-tubes are below a thick glass plate. The contacts go on the glass plate, and I have two thick wooden boards cut into shape which go on top. If the paper is thick and very warped, I put some additional weight on it, books usually (some volumes of my old encyclopedia).
    In this way I do not need a contact frame at all, and I am able to print quite large without problems. Because I use two wooden boards, I can even check exposure inbetween (useful with some processes).

  10. #10
    gr82bart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjsphoto
    I have a contact frame from www.pellandphoto.com and they are just excellent.
    I wish I knew about this company before I bought the one from B&H Photo. These look amazing. I think I'll buy one from them anyway and donate/sell/throw away the one I bought from B&H.

    Art. (Now I know what they are called!)
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

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