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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Louisiana, USA
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    I really have to relate this, simply because it makes my point that contact sheets are not really that useful.

    When I was a newspaper photographer (with a rotating door of news editors and photo editors), one of the photo editors I dealt with required contact sheets of everything.

    I shot an MVA (motor vehicle accident) one day that wasn't particularly earthshaking but I had some good pictures. The photo editor looked at my contact sheet and said, "I don't see anything" and went home for the day. I was PO'd because I knew what I had shot. I went to the lab, printed a photo of a firefighter pulling an infant out of the smashed up car and gave it to the news editor--sort of going over the PE's head. It ran small inside the paper but it ran. But, at the end of the year, I won a first place in news photography for that picture.

    Stuff on contact sheets are hard to resolve. Your eye, your mind and a negative are all you really need.

  2. #22
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
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    If you shoot multiple subjects on the same roll, contact sheets assist in keeping track of your negatives.

    If you shoot several images of the same subject, with only minor differences between negatives, contact sheets assist in identifying the right negative.

    There are other methods (carefully numbered and labeled proofs, carefully labelled scans, etc.) but contact sheets are the easiest way to keep track.

    Just make sure to label the contact sheet and the negative sleeves carefully, and use film with frame numbers, or add your own.

    Matt

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Seattle
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    I also used a sheet of glass from the local window store with ground edges. In addition, I put a border on it using black gaffer's tape. This gives me somewhere to grab the glass without leaving fingerprints. Plus I don't worry as much about chipping the edges of the glass accidentally.

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