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  1. #1

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    AmerGraph ULF-28 Xenon Printing Source

    I am the proud owner of a brand new AmerGraph ULF-28. The ULF-28 is a Continuous Wave Xenon printing light, designed for photographers printing with both silver and alternative processes. As I understand matters, I am the first person to own this unit, and in exchange for this considerable privilege I intend to work with it extensively over the course of the next few weeks, and eventually do a very thorough review of it for publication.

    What I can tell you is this. The AmerGraph ULF-28 is physically similar to the NuArc 26-1k and 26-1ks series. But the difference ends there. The ULF-28 uses a 1200 watt continuous wave Xenon bulb, in contrast to the 1000 watt metal halide bulb of the NuArc 26-1ks. The difference between the two is significant, both in printing speed, in striking ability and in full radiation. First, the continuous wave Xenon light reaches full output almost immediately, so that 10 integrated units is in fact 10 seconds, and 250 integrated units is almost exactly 250 seconds. Second, the continuous wave Xenon bulb will strike up immediately after shut-off. And finally, printing speeds are much faster. My initial tests indicate that the ULF-28 is about 1.5 stops faster in printing speed than the NuArc 26-1k and my bank of BL tubes. This assessment may change with further testing, but that is what I am seeing right now. Also, the ULF-28 has a computer based program system that allows numerous pre-programming (ten in ROM and ten free base) possibilities not available in other light sources.

    One of the purposes of the designers was to produce a light source that could be configured to print with both UV sensitive processes and with silver contact printing processes. The configuration involves a light attenuator, placed between the bulb and the sensitive material, to which one can add or subtract ND filters. I will be testing all of this for the review that I plan to do. I think this is an important feature of the unit since I anticipate that more and more people will be contact printing with silver papers in the future than projecti0n printing

    More details to come, but my preliminary assessment is that the ULF-28 is one great printer for contact printing.

    Sandy

  2. #2

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    Is this a short-arc bulb?
    art is about managing compromise

  3. #3

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    How much would something like this cost?

  4. #4

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    You got me on the question. I don't know the difference between a short-arc and long-arc bulb. I can tell you all about the SPD charts of the various bulbs (mercury doped, iron doped, etc.) available for the ULF-28 but don't know anything about the arc issue. But I will find out if you give me more information?

    Sandy


    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    Is this a short-arc bulb?

  5. #5

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    Somewhere in the $1900 to $2300 range, probably at the lower end if purchased directly from AmerGraph.

    Not cheap of course, but for folks who want the best this unit is at the top of the best.

    Sandy


    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Schultz
    How much would something like this cost?
    Last edited by sanking; 03-17-2006 at 09:18 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Sandy,
    This is exciting news! Will look forward to more info as you continue your research!

  7. #7

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    Dave,

    I am pretty excited printing with this machine. Man, is it nice!

    And what is also very exciting is that this is the first lighting unit of its type designed and marketed for us, and by that I mean photographers, both alternative workers and those who contact print with silver contact papers.

    Sandy





    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wooten
    Sandy,
    This is exciting news! Will look forward to more info as you continue your research!

  8. #8

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    MacBeth's pulse xenon PX -56 (tube) was used in GA 139 Durst

    It was 5000 K bright and hot. Reguired fans in and out of head. Yet was only 1500 watts. It enabled enlarged separations through the stability and registration of the Graphic Arts Dust. The tubes were expensive. Does this sound like what you are working with?

  9. #9

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    OK, bright and hot are relative terms. The output of the 1200 watt Continuos Wave Xenon bulb does put out heat, but it is dissipated well by the use of a single output fan, of the same type you see on the NuArc 26-1k series. I worked with a NuArc 26-1k for several years and based on that experience I do not believe there is much difference in heat build-up between the ULF-28 and the NuArc 26-1k. In fact, probably less with the ULF-28 than with the NuArc. Bright it definitley is, but there is a curtain that draws around the unit to protect one from the UV light so in use one sees very little light.

    Sandy



    Quote Originally Posted by Clueless
    It was 5000 K bright and hot. Reguired fans in and out of head. Yet was only 1500 watts. It enabled enlarged separations through the stability and registration of the Graphic Arts Dust. The tubes were expensive. Does this sound like what you are working with?

  10. #10

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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenon_arc_lamp

    okay maybe this will get you started.
    art is about managing compromise

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