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  1. #11
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Kev, I use a sheet of anti-glare glass from the frame shop, that has helped me.
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  2. #12
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    One of my contact frames from the 1940's has a glass which is a very fine ground glass, finer than nay I have ever seen on a camera. I never get Newton's rings when using it so it is my frame of choice when the humidity gets above about 40%.

    You might try using the ground glass out of your camera.

    To answer the questio I know will come, No, I have never seen any loss of sharpness using the ground glass.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  3. #13

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    I had the same problem with TMY 400 recently after not having the problem before. I also think that humidity had much to do with it. I am in the Pacific Northwest. I did like Robert and went to a glass shop and got a large piece of non-glare glass for $5 and cut it to sizes. I see no difference in the prints from using regualr glass, except that I no longer get the Newton rings. Jim may have a frame that someone changed the glass to non-glare, also. It is a very fine texture. You have to look at the glass at an angle to see the difference between the sides. Inexpensive and effective solution for me.

  4. #14
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    Kevin,

    I would suspect its something to do with the humidity/temperature conditions that you are currently experiencing. If you can run the a/c, the humidity will dry out out and the temperature will stabilize.

    Alex
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
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  5. #15
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Just a thought -- is it possible you could have had the glass out of the frame to clean it, and got it back in with the anti-Newton side up instead of down?
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  6. #16

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    Hi - I've heard that a light spray with hairspay on the side of the glass facing the negative works - people say it works with scanners, too. If it doesn't work, you can just clean it off. I expect it works by laying down a thin, non-even film that stops the interference pattern occurring, but I have not tried it myself.

    Regards,
    Neil.

  7. #17
    rmolson's Avatar
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    Newton Rings

    I am dating myself but years ago I was a scanner operator. We taped sheet film color transparencies to the polished drum of the scanner. Newton rings were a headache. We used a small atomizer with off set spray powder from the press room which was basically corn starch .Holding the transparency in one hand and the atomizer in the other a weak spray was sprayed into the air and the transparency waved through it. It sounds weird but that would be enough to allow a tiny amount of powder to collect on the surface of the film and prevent Newtons rings between the emulsion and the drum surface.If you could see the powder you knew you had sprayed too much.

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