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  1. #11

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    Have actually done this with good results. I used piece of black paper (11x14) cut it off folded so that a piece of 8x10 paper would fit with a window cut into it for the 5x7 negative, use some rubylith tape on the corners to hold the negative in place (on the inside) and put the whole thing in one of the Preimer contact printers. Worked perfect....was able to print 12 prints in a session without any problem. Just placed the 8x10 paper into the fold and lined up the top...in my case I had the window cut off center so that there was more 'white space' at the bottom.

    Hope this helps.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  2. #12
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    I know a photog who tapes two 4x5 negs onto a 8x10 glass negative carrier using clear sticky tape (scotch tape) and then enlarges them onto a piece of photo paper. The tape does not show up in the photograph, but I have noticed that scotch tape does block some UV light and shows up in my carbon prints.

    If one uses a thin mask on the same side of the glass as the neg (the same thickness or less than the film) pressure on the neg should give good contact. Using a material under the paper such as the closed cell foam, should also help to maintain good contact if there is a little thickness difference between the mask and the negative.

    Putting the mask on top of the glass will also work -- but if the glass is thick, one may not get quite as sharp of a border around the neg.

    But of course the best thing is to try it out a few different methods...best of luck!
    Last edited by Vaughn; 02-07-2007 at 08:55 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: addition

  3. #13

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    Place the ruby lith/matboard or black material on top of the glass of the contact printing frame. Make sure you don't have too thick of glass.

    On the side of the glass where the negative is put against, use tape and create somewhat of "stops" to butt the negative and paper against so they match up with the mat overtop.

    This way, you just leave the top mat always on the glass, and all you do is lay the negative and paper in the contact frame and close it up to expose. VERY SIMPLE.

  4. #14
    paulie's Avatar
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    lithographers tape is the best way

  5. #15

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    Haven't paid too much attention to this, but what if you masked off the negative part on a piece of glass, then spray painted the black part? Then you could tape the negative to the spray painted part. You'd have a dedicated contact printer for the size negative you were printing.

    Might have to scuff the glass up with some sandpaper to get the paint to stick? I don't really know.

  6. #16
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    It will be a thousand times easier to just projection print it. You can crop out the dust specs at the edges or print full frame; either way you are in control.

  7. #17
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    lithographers tape is the only way to do this any other way will not work well, i have three glass plates with correct size apertures for 6x9 5x4 and 10 x 8 .

    i only mask the area around the neg with lith tape, then the rest of the plate is masked using card stock

    the lith tape is on the bottom of the glass thats comes in contact with the neg, card stock mask on top surface of the glass

    white borders + centered.

    way better than blowing up negs on a enlarger, so 20th century
    Last edited by paulie; 03-22-2010 at 07:59 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #18

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    I've done this by masking off the 8x10 with a mask made from the black plastic that paper comes in. I taped the mask to the glass of a contact printing frame, line up where there paper needs to be, and tape the negative to the glass. I'm printing these with a black border.

  9. #19

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    Sep 2002
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    What you plan to do is not recommended for the following reasons--unless you plan to overmat the print right to the edge of the print. But I assume you do not plan to do that. The large white borders of glossy paper will be the brightest thing the eye sees when looking at your print. It will be distracting from the tones of the print itself.

    So why a large black border? That is not good either, as a large black area surrounding the print will make any light tone close to the edge of the print difficult to evaluate. Those tones will look blown out.

    If you overmat the print right to the edge then the large white border you propose as fine, but if you are going to do that why waste half the sheet of paper?

    Michael A. Smith

  10. #20

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    Oct 2002
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    A suggestion: Alistair Inglis, who is a Sponsor of APUG, makes a variety of very creative products for Analog photographers. Give Alistair a call and discuss your needs. I am sure that he will be able to craft a solution, or give you guidance on solving the problem yourselves. He is a great guy who is very generous with his advice and help.

    Ed

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