Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,761   Posts: 1,516,111   Online: 911
      
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    420
    Images
    5

    Anyone contact print on film?

    I'd like to make a few transparencies from existing negs and thought someone here MUST have done so in the past. Sure would be nice if I could just use my current stock of Ilford Delta 100, as well.

    Yep, I know the image will be flopped if viewed through the base, but any other hang-ups other than a gain in contrast?

    Have any starting point suggestions for exposure via enlarger (height, f stop, time)? Or maybe exposure via strobe in the darkroom (GN, distance from contact frame)?

    Developing in DDX...maybe a pull?

    Thanks!

    Jo

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    I have contact printed to make enlarged negs. The contrast can be adjusted via development times. Suggesting a time etc would be foolish of me since a great deal depends on the enlarger bulb wattage...not to mention the density of your original negs. Strobes would be much more difficult than using the enlarger as your exposure light source.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  3. #3
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    I've used 2302 print film from Kodak that I got from an APUG member, developped in paper developer. Contact exposure in darkroom using the enlarger light is sufficient. I wrote an article about it here:
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum216/...much-fuss.html

    What you need to know about slide printing is that the final contrast needs to be pretty high (gamma around 1.5) to have a good looking slide. Film that is developed for printing on paper has a low contrast (gamma around 0.6 say).

    To create a slide with 1.5 gamma out of a 0.6 gamma negative, you need a positive that can be developped to about gamma=2.5, and that's a lot of contrast. Normal in-camera emulsions (tri-x, plus-x, hp5, delta 100, etc) cannot give enough contrast to be used as print films, plus they don't have a transparent base.

    A print film like 2302 or 5302 has a transparent base, and can be developped to a gamma of 2.5 by using a high-energy developer like D-97 (formula available on Kodak website). Stock Dektol could be in the good ballpark as well. The other neat thing is that print film are blue-sensitive only, so that you can either develop them by inspection under safelight, or use them in-camera as an old-fashioned negative. See my gallery for a photo made with 2302: http://www.apug.org/gallery/showphot...29&ppuser=6132
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  4. #4
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Formula for D-97:
    http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/su.../h241514.shtml

    It's very similar to Dektol (D-72) in terms of basic ingredients, but the proportions are different. I never tried D-97, but I'm sure Dektol would have plenty enough activity for this purpose.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    278
    I've contact printed 35mm negs onto Kodak Direct Positive Release film, to make slides. It works very well. If you are going to enlarge or contact print the image onto regular photographic film, you will need a shutter on your enlarger. Film for in camera use is much faster than the films mentioned, which are rated at enlarging speed, similar to paper speed. It's fun and interesting to do and I wish you luck.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Van Buren, Arkansas
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,412
    Images
    101
    You can make transparent positive images from negatives by enlargement or contact on Litho film. Develop in Dektol, 1:2. works very well. The Dektol renders full tones, but snappy. Litho film should use red safelight.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Northeast Ohio
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    420
    Images
    5
    Thanks folks!

    Looks like lith film is my best option for 4X5 negs. Quite inexpensive, as well. Although, I hear that rare and exotic developer "Dektol" is pricey and tough to find



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin