Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,901   Posts: 1,584,436   Online: 813
      
Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst 12345678910 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 105
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Scottsdale, Arizona
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    360
    I enjoy (ed) using the paper and really liked the results. Yes, I have seen great prints on other paper....but I really like the look of the AZO /chloride paper.

    I am very optimistic about the outcome and eager to get more paper...as I am too judicious in my current use of remaining azo...

    I appreciate Michael and Paula's effort in this endeavor and wish them the best.

    In the meantime I will continue to have fun and explore other papers / developers, etc.

    After all, part of the fun is the journey, no?

  2. #32

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Greenville, SC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,813
    Images
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by doughowk View Post
    So proper marketing would be "Lodima Paper: in the grand tradition of Adams, the Westons & others who care about their print quality". While hype would be "it'll last forever" fine print, if properly sealed in time-capsule ;-)

    I'm looking forward to using Lodima paper. I'm learning to like Kallitypes; but there is something special about a contact print made on B&W glossy paper.
    Many people have coded preference for prints with high Dmax and glossy surfaces and find it hard to really like prints like kallitype and pt/pd on matte surface papers. I have a fair amount of expertise in printing both of these processes, but must admit that sometimes the lack of brillance is disappointing. They always look so great in the water, but on dry-down the magic just goes away. Carbon prints, on the other hand, have things going on that you won't see in any other process because of the 3-d dimensional quality produced by the relief, and they can have Dmax as great as silver. It is truly the most distinctive and unique of all photographic processes.

    I don't do much silver printing, but what little I have done has been with AZO. I like the look, and I also like the fact that it prints more like alternative process work (long exposures) than silver. And fortuntely, I still have a fair amount of 20X24" AZO in #2 and #3.

    One must appreciate people like Michael Smith who have found the perfect combination of film and paper for their work and have worked so hard to keep them available, at considerable sacrifice I imagine to their own financial well-being. Let's wish them luck in working out the kinks with the future Lodima paper.

    Sandy King

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Lafayette, La.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    98
    Images
    8
    I've used the last of my Azo, and eagerly await its replacement.
    I liked the simplicity of making prints with just a bare lightbulb, no contrast filters. And because the paper was so slow, flashing was much easier to get texture into bare white highlights.

    So to repeat the start of the thread, what's everyone going to use in the meantime? I think I'll get graded ilford paper and try Ansco developer.

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Omaha, Nebraska
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,512
    Images
    4
    Thanks Alex for sharing your experiences and providing some avenues to explore.

    There really is no comparison between a well crafted AZO print and a print made on other enlargement papers. That is not to say an AZO print is superior, just that I don't think you can get that close to the look of an AZO print when you put it next to a print made on another paper. I hope Lodima does make it to market because I do believe that there is a quality to a silver chloride print that puts it in a category all by itself like platinum, collodion or a dag.

    With that being said, I am in the same boat as others. I played around with AZO after the before mentioned View Camera article was published and increased my interest after joining APUG. I joined the Chinese group order of Amidol, but used up all my AZO before the amidol arrived. Now I can't justify buying AZO at current prices and since it looks like Lodima is at minimum 1 to possibly 2 years away I will end up selling the amidol since I don't believe it gives any advantages over Ansco 130 or PPPD or (or even dektol and selenium toning in some cases) with standard projection papers. When Lodima makes it to market there will probably be enough interest generated to get another large amidol order put together. Untill then, like Alex I will experiment to get something I like for contact printing 8x10 and larger negs.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  5. #35
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    23,544
    Images
    65
    How many of you ferrotype your glossy prints? After all, gloss does not come into its own on FB glossy papers until they are ferrotyped.

    This is one of the methods used by the masters in the 30s, 40s and 50s.

    PE

  6. #36
    juan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    St. Simons Island, Georgia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,646
    Images
    4
    I don't ferrotype - I never cared for the look. It seems to me that the ferrotyped surface is just too obvious, and thus, distracts - sort of like too much reverb in an audio mix.
    juan

  7. #37
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Kansas, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,895
    Images
    63
    I don't ferrotype either. I've seen it done in many years gone by but I generally prefer the natural texture of the glossy FB paper.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  8. #38

    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    6,242
    I ferrotyped for a time back in the 1980's but like others have said, I don't like the look.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  9. #39
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,486
    Images
    20
    I've found that if I take a neg scaled for enlarging paper that I've printed on Oriental Seagull grade 2, I can get a very similar look to the Azo print I can make from the same neg, with a slight preference for the Azo print.

    If I take a neg scaled for Azo, though, I can get a much better print on Azo than I could with enlarging paper, and I think this is part of the reason that Azo prints have the potential to look as good as they do--you can use a richer negative.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #40
    Robert Hall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lehi, Utah
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,040
    Images
    28
    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller View Post
    I ferrotyped for a time back in the 1980's but like others have said, I don't like the look.
    Ah, yes, the 80's.

    Big hair, Journey, and ferrotyped glossy prints.

    Those were the days.
    Robert Hall
    www.RobertHall.com
    www.RobertHall.com/mobile
    Apug Portfolio
    Facebook Profile


    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

Page 4 of 11 FirstFirst 12345678910 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin