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  1. #1

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    Haloid Contact Paper

    You guys and gals might be interested in this, or not…...

    I was given a box of Haloid contact printing paper 8x10.5 semi matt surface grade 3 recently. The box is dated Feb 1958 and was pulled from a rear storage room. Who knows how this was stored for all these years but its not been ideal for sure. Haloid is of course the original name of Xerox so I find it amusing that I am printing on Xerox paper. Its also neat that I grew up a short bike ride from the facility where this was made. I hear Weston used to print on the Haloid paper? Well it is pretty neat to print on some of the same papers he might have used as well.

    Anyway I tried ektaflo dev with my first test of the paper, just to make sure it was still viable. As it made an image I did up a tray of amidol gaf 113. I know I should have saved the sample but I immediately noticed the amidol was much muddier in the highlights and the blacks were cooler yet not really blacker to me. I ended up going back to the warm tone ektaflo because I don’t like cold prints and it really was giving me more highlight separation, or so it seemed. Ektaflo also produces a very good dmax for a warm tone developer and I use it frequently on chloro-bromide papers.

    Regardless I was able to get a decent prints out of the paper albeit a touch foggy in the white areas. I did not use any anti-fog agent because I don’t have any. Its very interesting to me that a paper expired for almost 50 years is still able to produce any image at all. Granted this print is a bit flatter than I normally print but its 50 years expired!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wboro door II.jpg  

  2. #2
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    In 1959 and 1960 we used Haloid paper in 10x10 and 10x19 for contact printing our aerial photos.

    PE

  3. #3

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    If you do get some anti-fog, you could probably clear up any muddiness.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for posting this. I have about 4 boxes of Haloid that were part of an auction lot I purchased recently, that are similar vintage, all of them still sealed. I've not gotten around to trying it out, but your results are encouraging, maybe I'll crack one of these and see what happens.

    Maybe this will be the "make prints on 50 year old paper" thread.

  5. #5
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I have some from that era too, 10x10" grade 2. It's a foggy and has lost some contrast, but in Smith's Amidol I call it about a grade 1 compared to Azo grade 2--handy for negs that I've targeted more for albumen than for Azo.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #6
    michael9793's Avatar
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    there is a defender's developer I got off this site or M&P site I can't remember, but it is for old papers and can be used on papers that fog and it keeps it from fogging. I have a box of 1972 kodabromide, but havn't used it yet. the guy I got it form says it works, if you are interested I can post it.

    Mike A
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  7. #7
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    Defender paper evolved into Dupont paper.

    PE

  8. #8
    michael9793's Avatar
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    IT's a defender developer which from what your saying must have been a dupont developer. It uses Chlorohydroquinone (sp). very expensive and hard to fine.
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

  9. #9
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    Ok, the Defender product line became the Dupont line of products, just as Haloid evolved into Xerox over time. Chlorohydroquinone is no longer produced anywhere, AFAIK, due to difficulty in the synthesis and toxicity. I'm not sure of the details. My neighbor used to make it at EK.

    PE

  10. #10
    michael9793's Avatar
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    I bought 100 grams just 6 months ago and it cost me about $60.00 for the jar.
    This jar didn't look like it was produced recently
    "Capturing an image is only one step of the long chain of events to create a beautiful Photograph” See my updated website: mandersenphotography.com

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