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  1. #11
    juan's Avatar
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    I use plate glass in my contact printer with no problems. In my scanner, I use two sheets of non-glare picture frame glass from the framing shop. I put the dull side towards the negative on both top and bottom. Cost for two sheets of glass cut 8x10 with buffed edges was about $10. If you're having Newton's ring problems, a sheet of this glass might help. It's certainly cheap enough to try.
    juan

  2. #12

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    Anytime light moves from one medium, such as air, to another, such as glass, it refracts. In theory, when the glass surfaces are parallel the shift is back to the original path. My concern in putting glass over the paper for enlarging would be whether the glass surfaces are perfectly parallel, or how imperfect they might be, and whether the surfaces are in perfect alignment with the lens, which almost certainly, they will not be.
    Whether those imperfections are enough to matter for your eyes is a different issue.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by juan View Post
    I use plate glass in my contact printer with no problems. In my
    scanner, I use two sheets of non-glare picture frame glass from
    the framing shop. I put the dull side towards the negative on both
    top and bottom. Cost for two sheets of glass cut 8x10 with buffed
    edges was about $10. If you're having Newton's ring problems,
    a sheet of this glass might help. It's certainly cheap
    enough to try. juan
    So you sandwich the negative between two sheets of glare
    free glass, both dull sides in contact with the negative. Dull
    sides sound bad. Dull yet clear? That glass will need a look.
    I'd be laying a glass sheet upon the enlarging paper. Dan

  4. #14
    Steve Sherman's Avatar
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    I used to use a piece of plae glas
    Real Photographs are Born Wet !
    http://www.steve-sherman.com

  5. #15
    Steve Sherman's Avatar
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    The previous post didn't work out to well.

    I used to use a piece of 1/4" plate glass with not frame. In using Azo I found the printing time quite long. Just happened to switch to a vacuum frame which uses a piece of clear 1/8" glass, the printing times were significantly shorter with the same negatives. I asked a glass person why and he said that plate glass is inherently stronger than ordinary glass and actually has a light reducing effect, he simply asked if the sides of the glass were at all green, that is an indication of "plate" glass which reduces light transmission.

    Cheers!
    Real Photographs are Born Wet !
    http://www.steve-sherman.com

  6. #16
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I use "Non-Glare" glass from picture frames. I have no problem with Newton Rings, and the texture does not effect the sharpness of the image. It is thin and therefore gives me fast printing times.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Sherman View Post
    The previous post didn't work out to well.

    I used to use a piece of 1/4" plate glass with not frame. In using Azo I found the printing time quite long. Just happened to switch to a vacuum frame which uses a piece of clear 1/8" glass, the printing times were significantly shorter with the same negatives. I asked a glass person why and he said that plate glass is inherently stronger than ordinary glass and actually has a light reducing effect, he simply asked if the sides of the glass were at all green, that is an indication of "plate" glass which reduces light transmission.

    Cheers!
    Also, Azo is largely sensitive to UV and glass tends to block UV - that's why UV lenses are made of quartz. I'd bet that if you were using ordinary enlarging paper, you wouldn't see nearly as much difference between the 2 pieces of glass.

    Dan

  8. #18

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    glass is not the whole issue

    humidity causes the geletine to swell more than the backing thus the increase in newtons rings in high humidity due to the decrease in flatness in the film and the resulting irregularity in contact with glass

    solutions in regular use for at least 100+ years that will work:

    use thicker glass-it weighs more and is stiffer so you get better contact between glass and neg/pos/whatever

    use nonglare picture framers glass with texture against film

    dust with offset powder-cornstarch

    use a vacuum easel without glass

    strip neg and/or pos into support flat with or without window-this will make film lie flatter

    experiment with emulsion up/down in combination and against glass

    use film with retouching surface on on one or both sides

    fyi: glass blocks uv, float and plate glass contains iron that turns glass cyan and blocks more uv-whaterver is a poor alt process artist to do????--duh --use plastic

    fyi: glass both "water white", window glass, nonglare or whatever has been and still is in use daily for 100+ years in all things photgraphic to produce everything you see in print and on the packageing of everything you buy-yes a gel(itine)filter is optically better than any glass but so what-yes an optical flat is more parallel than window glass but so what-yes a vacuum easel or frame will pull material flat but so what

    without skill, technique, craft and knowledge gained by working smarter-not harder-or worse yet, by instead throwing money at a problem all you get is is foolishness-and crafty venders richer and fatter

    vaya con dios

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