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  1. #11

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    The Paterson doesn't flap but even then there is a problem with capturing all the info in the rebate, namely the film type. There was a thread on this but I forget what it was called.

    However the Paterson will still only do 36 frames. There aren't any I know that will do 37. Personally I would sacrifice the 37th for the benefits of a contact printer and this is a big sacrifice for a Scotsman.

    However if you need to contact more than 36 frames you could try a clear neg holder which will cover 42 frames(7x6) and simply cover it with glass on top of a piece of sponge. Of course you need bigger than 8x10 paper.

    Big sledgehammer to crack a small nut in my opinion.

    pentaxuser

  2. #12

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    Yeah I did notice that with carefull laying of the negs I could fit 7 rows on a single sheet of 8x10, BTW I have been cutting the paperr into thin sheets in order to test what exposure I need for each contact print, is this what most people do?Oh and does the contrast filter make much difference when contact printing?
    Last edited by ajuk; 05-30-2007 at 06:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

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    If you want to see plenty of detail in the contact print the general advice is to print at no more than grade 2 and keep exposure to a minimum commensurate with still having detail. Some may look a little grey and flat but give you a good idea of which you want to print full sized.

    If you can be sure that all or at least most of your negs will all print at a certain correct grade then contact printing at that grade with an exposure that reproduces a miniture frame as you'd want the final print to be is worth trying.

    If you haven't got it, I'd get Tim Rudman's book " The Photographer's Master Printing Course. He has some useful things to say about contact printing. Oh and just a few more things about the whole gamut of printing.

    pentaxuser

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    If you can be sure that all or at least most of your negs will all print at a certain correct grade then contact printing at that grade with an exposure that reproduces a miniture frame as you'd want the final print to be is worth trying.
    I guess that depends on whether you want your proofs to be pretty or if you want them to be an accurate source of information for evaluating the quality of the negatives. I prefer the latter so for me, the proper exposure is the minimum time to produce maximum black through film base and fog.
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  5. #15

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    There is Paterson contact printer which can be used for more than 36 frames of 35mm film contact sheet making (for example you have roll of film with 39 frames exposed, that is for example 6 strips with 6 frames and 7th strip with 3 frames, or other combinations like 7 strips with 5 frames, etc...). Its product number is PTP621, and use 24x30cm (9.5x12in) paper size, not 20x25 (8x10in). See more at: http://www.patersonphotographic.com/...cs%20index.htm

    That printer does not have guides for film strips, so it can be used for 35mm films, 120 films and large format films up to 24x30cm (9.5x12in) film size, but you have to line up film strips (sheet/s) manually and take care film strips (sheet/s) not to move when close it. It costs about 45 EUROS. If that is expencive, simply use piece of clear glass about 2mm thick. You can put your film strips into clear film sleeves, thus avoid direct contact of glass with film strips.
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajuk View Post
    Just bought a contact printer and there is only room on it for 6 strips, when I get 7 out of every roll so how is this any use?

    Now answer to OP question: I have 120 film printer which can make contact print of 6x6 frames on one sheet of 20x25cm (8x10in) paper. But I use 6x7 camera, and my printer can not make contact print of whole film on one sheet of paper. My solution for that is to make as many frames as can on one sheet, and then tear second sheet of paper to make rest of frames.

    So, in your case, you use one sheet of paper for 6 strips, take second sheet of paper, tear enough to make contact print of 7th strip, and rest of second sheet of paper return to paper box, and use next time when you need to tear paper againg for 7th strip. You can use one box specially for keeping teared paper, and thus avoid mixing with not teared papers... That means two exposings for one film contact print, one for 6 strips with 6 frames on one sheet of paper, second for rest of film on teared paper (or of course other combinations you find appropriate for you).

    Or, if it is too much hassle for you, see my previous post and other people advices...
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
    No things in life should be left unfinis

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