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  1. #1
    loman's Avatar
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    Paterson 8x10 proofer vs. split back printing frame

    Hello
    I was just wondering whether a paterson 8x10 proofer will keep the paper and negative in as close contact as say a doug kennedy split back printing frame?
    I like the most working with the paterson type, but It's more important for me to get maximum sharpness out of my 8x10 contact prints.
    Any imput appreciated.
    Best Regards
    Mads Hartmann

  2. #2
    loman's Avatar
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    Sorry
    that should of course be input and not imput!

  3. #3
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    A split back frame is invaluable for contact printing regardless of the process being used. Be sure to get a good one like the one sold by Bostick & Sullivan. I'm sure a similar one is available in Europe.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  4. #4
    loman's Avatar
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    Hey Jim
    Ok, but I just wanted to know it the paterson proofer will do an equally good job, in keeping the the negative an paper in close contact, and at the same time supply even pressure, as well, as the high quality split back frames.
    Best Regards
    Mads

  5. #5
    Akki14's Avatar
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    The clip went on my paterson 8x10 neg proofer after maybe 2 months of use (though the item was secondhand but "like new in box"). My 1920s splitback frames I use for alt processing haven't broken yet, but since I use them for alt process printing-out, they're more invaluable for the being able to see when the exposure is enough. I've not bought any of the new printing frames out there.
    Also with the proofer I think that a full 8x10 would have a mark at the bottom left by the metal clip.
    ~Heather
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  6. #6
    loman's Avatar
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    Ok that's important input. Cause It's gonna see some heavy use. I think I'll go for a doug kennedy split back frame then. They look really nice.
    By the way, this may be a stupid question, but how do you make sure that the negative is where you want it to be on the paper, when you are using 5x7 film and 8x10 paper? It seems to me that there would be a lot of fiddling with a split back frame, where as on a paterson proofer you just put it where you want the negative on the paper, and close the hinged glass.
    Cheers
    Mads

  7. #7
    Akki14's Avatar
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    I kind of hold the negative on the paper then with a sort of rocking motion I put the paper and neg face down in the printing frame. I have cheated a little and used the tiniest little pieces of masking tape in the negative border which is fine if you've only coated an area as big as the image and not the negative itself, I guess if you wanted to go with paper/card masks, you could try the tacking down with tape method too.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

  8. #8
    rwyoung's Avatar
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    I've built up the stack upside down. The back of the frame sits on the counter, felt side up. Place sensitized paper. Place negative. Place glass (carefully). Drop frame around all and flip over. Use your finger tips to hold some pressure during the flip or things will shift. Then lock it down and go make the exposure.

    The base on mine happens to sit quite level and sturdy when upside down. However you could easily glue down some blocks or stack up matboard or something to make a cradle.
    Don't sweat the petty things and don't pet the sweaty things! http://rwyoung.wordpress.com

  9. #9

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    Paterson have soft base for papers, like spoonge (atleast my printer has it). Theory is that this paper base will adopt (bend) itself (an paper on it) to any shape needed to have firm pressure of negatives on paper. So, in theory it will adopt paper in such way that it will eliminate that space (part of millimetre) between negative and paper which is made because of negative guides, and thus negative is flat pressed firmly on paper.

    In my case Paterson printer works for me, but you really must try it to see will it work for you.

    Paterson also have printer without negative guides, with same soft paper base, so maybe that will work. It is made for 24x30cm paper not 20x25, but nobody stops you to use 20x25 paper in that printer With it you must place negative directly on paper, not insert negative into guides. And this bigger printer have thicker glass than 20x25 printer (I even think 20x25 printer have plastic and not "real" glass while bigger printer have "real" glass, but can't tell for sure).
    Bosnia... You don't have to be crazy to live here, but it helps...
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