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  1. #11

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    David, Think so, huh????
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  2. #12
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    </span><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (David A. Goldfarb @ Mar 7 2003, 11:53 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'>If the negative is flat and you want up to one zone of expansion, you won&#39;t blow the highlights, but you will bring them up one zone</td></tr></table><span class='postcolor'>
    How does it affect pyro stain?
    Jim

  3. #13
    Les McLean's Avatar
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    I&#39;ve never used Azo or Amidol but when faced with a flat negative that needs more contrast than I can get with the hardest paper grade available I resort to underexposure and overdevelopment just as I would do when looking to increase the contrast when developing film.

    The procedure is as follows. Make the best possible print even though you know it needs more contrast. Make a second print but reduce the exposure by 30 to 50% and process in the same developer used for the first print. You will have to develop by inspection which could take up to 40 minutes, that&#39;s the longest I&#39;ve developed in these circumstances. I process in the dark, switching on the safelight occasionally to check the progress. Clearly there is a large degree of trial and error involved but it does work with both graded and VC papers. Don&#39;t be afraid to go to the extremes to get a result.

    "Digital circuits are made from analogue parts"
    Fourtune Cookie-Brooklyn May 2006

    Website: www.lesmcleanphotography.com

  4. #14
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    c6h6o3: I haven&#39;t tried it yet with a pyro neg. Usually I&#39;ve used it with TMX, which I develop in D-76 (1+1), and which tends not to have enough density range for Azo, but I have read that it works with pyro negs. The effect is actually similar to pyro, since both add density proportionally to the highlights, though selenium intensification doesn&#39;t produce the edge effects, etc. of pyro. Try it with a neg that is otherwise a reject and report back&#33;
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #15
    Ole
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    C6H6O3? Would that be the pyrogallol formula, by any chance?


    What about using a higher-contrast paper developer? I can understand why people want to use Amidol (although I can&#39;t - no local sources), but even with Amidol it should be possible to make a high-contrast formula?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16

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    It may be worth a try to take it from the amidol to a second bath with full strength Dektol for about half or a quarter of the devloping time. Sometimes it will set the contrast. Good luck. Tom Perkins

  7. #17

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    Concerning the effect of selenium toning on a pryo neg, I was once told by the tech support guy at Bostick and Sullivan that this would intensify the negative but "eliminate" the pyro stain. "Eliminate" is my word, I don&#39;t remember his exact word. I often thought about trying the technique on an unevenly stained pyro neg to see if I could fix it.

  8. #18

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    You might try Fein&#39;s Amidol formula--it is very contrasty and gives very clean high values due the quantity of anti-foggant and citric acid. However, it typically gives a rather blue-black image color.

  9. #19

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    Thanks Ed.

    And, while you are here, I remember reading in your Smith-Amidol article that you tone prints in selenium at a much different dilution than he does. Did you try it his way and find that it didn&#39;t work for you or that your lower dilition works better or faster? In other words, why the difference?

    dgh

    David G Hall

  10. #20

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    I keep a bottle of selenium toner in a standard dilution of 1:15, so that is what I used. I pulled the print when it reached the tone I liked. I would be willing to bet the 1:15 works a lot faster than the 1:128, though I&#39;m not saying it is better or worse--just that it works for me.

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