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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Yes, light color influeces contranst of VC materials.
    cool, i appreciate you helping me out here.
    i am kind of oblivious to this sort of thing ...

    john
    im empty, good luck

  2. #42
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee View Post
    Mateo may be right about this.

    I have never worried about the neg touching the foam. I have never seen a problem with it. I dont wear white gloves either. I do wash my hands a lot.

    Am I correct in assuming that in your 30 years of darkroom work you have never made a contact print?

    lee\c
    I recall making some 4x5 contacts in graduate school, but other than that, never an 8x10. I used to make what one would call 'proof prints' of pages of roll-film negatives back in the 70s and early 80s but stopped. I can safely say that up till a few days ago I was 100% projection printing.

    I think based on some of these suggestions I am going to try some 'framing' glass that I have and see how that works. I could weight it at the edges to simulate thicker glass. If that works then I could have a glass co. cut and edge-polish a nice thick piece of glass for me. The issue of dusting the negative under the safelight still is somewhat of a dilema, I wonder if those little portable safelights that you can wear around your neck are bright enough to show the dust when held close to the negative?

    Maybe I'll pick up a Spotone kit, but I hope using it won't be my standard routine.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mateo View Post
    I think we're all getting laughed at here.
    Oh yea, I spent two months working almost non-stop on a project (documented here: http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ad.php?t=29267) just to have a few laughs with you all....:rolleyes:


    Seriously, though, If you dust your negatives under white light or safelight, let me know. If you do it under white light, what do you do with the clean negative while you are preparing the paper and glass under safelight conditions? I think at this point this is this issue that will sway me between the simple glass plate vs the contact frame. I was kind of set on the contact frame until I re-read Adams, where he says he does not use it.

    Adams admits he did not do many contact prints at the time he wrote that chapter, so maybe he is not so much an expert on that topic. Also, his negatives are not currently contact printed:

    "The prints are made by projection rather than by contact, regardless of negative format. This ensures a consistency in finished size and also affords the greatest control of dodging and burning. Most of the negatives in the series are 8x10 format, but other negative sizes include 5x7, 4x5, 31/4x41/4, and 120 rollfilm. The 8x10 and 5x7 negatives are printed in the Beseler 8x10 enlarger designed by Ross, with a custom Aristo 12"x12" cold-light head. Negatives 4x5 and smaller are printed with an Omega D5500 enlarger with a diffusion color-head" from http://www.anseladams.com/content/ca...g_methods.html
    Last edited by ic-racer; 10-24-2007 at 10:24 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #44
    lee
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    ic racer typed this, "Oh yea, I spent two months working almost non-stop on a project (documented here: http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ad.php?t=29267) just to have a few laughs with you all...."

    something just set off the alarm bells...

    Question 1. is this a new bellows?

    Question 2. if not, have you vacuumed it out lately? if not, do so.

    Question 3. how high is the relative humidity in your darkroom? if low I would add water someway to raise the humidity. That will cause the dust to start to lay down.

    Question 4. since you share a space with a wood working area I would re-double my efforts to clean the area again.

    I would also recommend that you get a non static cloth or brush to wipe the glass BEFORE you let it make contact with your neg and paper.

    lee\c

  5. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post


    ASSUMING THE ENVIRONMENT IS DUST FREE. I already have a Honeywell (http://www.apug.org/forums/437328-post428.html. Its a great Idea to hook it to a timer to run it at night. I already have humidity control with dehumidifier, a humidifier (for different times of the year) and a sling phychrometer and a 'dial gauge' hygrometer to monitor humidity. Goals are 55 in the summer and 45 in the winter. (Without intervention the summer humidity is 65-70 and the winter humidity is 25-30)
    I had a look at this link. I don't see how you can have a dust-free environment when you're sharing your dark room with a work shop and storage. If I were you, I'd try to find some way to close off a dedicated darkroom area and make that as dust free as possible.

    Dan

  6. #46
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Seriously, though, If you dust your negatives under white light or safelight, let me know. If you do it under white light, what do you do with the clean negative while you are preparing the paper and glass under safelight conditions? I think at this point this is this issue that will sway me between the simple glass plate vs the contact frame. I was kind of set on the contact frame until I re-read Adams, where he says he does not use it.
    I use a contact print frame, and I dust the glass and the neg with a 4" Kinetronics brush and/or Dust Off with the lights on. Frame goes face down, neg face up on the glass, lights off. If I notice any dust under safelight, then I'll dust it off again.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #47
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    Who really WANTS to do contacts?

    After reading that web site on printing Adams work I was curious how you all felt about contact printing 8x10 vs Projection printing. That is, do you contact print because you don't have an 8x10 enlarger? Or do you do it because it is "better" than using an enlarger?

    Personally, I'd like to get an 8x10 enlarger at some point, if I decide to stick with the 8x10. I guess that if I were to convince myself that contacts were better, it would temper my enthusiasm for an 8x10 enlarger.

  8. #48
    Ian Leake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Who really WANTS to do contacts?
    I do, for one. OK, I use Pt/Pd but even when I was printing on enlarger paper I prefered contact prints. For me they are the right size, richer, "truer" (for want of a better word), and easier than enlarging. All of that is subjective (and other people will surely have a different opinion), but for me contact prints are the only way to go. I still have an enlarger, but only because I'd like to work out how to create internegatives from 6x6 roll film.

  9. #49
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    They're different. Big prints from big negs can be impressive, but contact prints can have a kind of three-dimensional quality that is characteristic of contact prints.

    There is also something appealing about working at a 1:1 ratio, where the image you see on the groundglass is the same size as the print.

    Contact printing of course opens up the possibility of other processes, and that has its attractions.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    After reading that web site on printing Adams work I was curious how you all felt about contact printing 8x10 vs Projection printing. That is, do you contact print because you don't have an 8x10 enlarger? Or do you do it because it is "better" than using an enlarger?

    Personally, I'd like to get an 8x10 enlarger at some point, if I decide to stick with the 8x10. I guess that if I were to convince myself that contacts were better, it would temper my enthusiasm for an 8x10 enlarger.

    PLEASE don't buy an 8x10 enlarger. APUG doesn't have enough file space on their servers to help you accomplish using one. If you can't contact print GIVE UP! My wife and I have taught kindergarteners how to contact print and with excellent results. I can't believe this discussion has gone on for 5 pages!

    Walker



 

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