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  1. #1
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
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    Bostick-Sullivan: contact printing frames question

    I was looking at the Bostick-Sullivan contact printing frames, and noticed that the 8x10 frame has an image exposure area of 9x11. So, how do you folks use these frames for 8x10? Do you cut down 11x14 paper to fit in the frame, or do you use spacers to print on 8x10 paper? I do not know of any paper that comes in the 9x11 size, hence the question.

    Thanks in advance.


    Best wishes,
    Sanjay

  2. #2
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    you just put the paper and the negative in the frame - it doesn't have to be square to the frame. All that matters is the frame produces tight even registration across the entire negative/paper contact.

  3. #3
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sanjay Sen View Post
    I was looking at the Bostick-Sullivan contact printing frames, and noticed that the 8x10 frame has an image exposure area of 9x11. So, how do you folks use these frames for 8x10? Do you cut down 11x14 paper to fit in the frame, or do you use spacers to print on 8x10 paper? I do not know of any paper that comes in the 9x11 size, hence the question.

    Thanks in advance.


    Best wishes,
    Sanjay
    As Scott said, you just center the paper and negative together. The reason they are over size is to allow one frame to serve for 8x10, and 8.5x11, primarily for alt process.

  4. #4
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    This is the frame I use, usually 8x10 frames crop out a little of the image area. This way you get the full picture and can trim or not to your specifications. Just line up the 8x10 film and paper and load it up. It has worked perfectly for me. Best. Shawn

  5. #5
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
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    Thanks, guys, for the prompt and helpful answers.


    Best wishes,
    Sanjay

  6. #6
    Alex Hawley's Avatar
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    The extra inch in each direction also greatly helps getting the paper and negative in and out of the frame.
    Semper Fi & God Bless America
    My Photography Blog

  7. #7
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley View Post
    The extra inch in each direction also greatly helps getting the paper and negative in and out of the frame.
    ... and that is the problem I have now: I'm using an 8x10 frame to print 8x10 negs, and it's a little irritating to get the paper (and negative) out.

  8. #8
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    When contacting 8x10 negatives, I would suggest going for the next size up (12x15). Then you can contact onto 11x4 paper if you wish, or eventually use it for alt processes (generally one wants a good amount of border for those.)

    I just think in the long run, buying a larger frame will save you money -- you won't have to buy a larger frame in the future, and the larger frame in handy to use for 8x10.

    Vaughn

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    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    I have the Bostick & Sullivan frame for 11x14, and I use it for 8x10 and 11x14 paper. It is one of the best modern frames out there, far superior to the Photographers Formulary frames. I also have a handful of antique frames, which I use because I got them essentially for free, and in sizes that I can't afford modern ones for (12x20, 14x17). In any case, it's a terrific frame. Get it and you won't regret it, but as Vaughn said, go one size up from whatever you think will be your largest maximum print size. That way, when the addiction catches you and you get an even bigger camera, you can still print without buying another frame!

  10. #10
    Sanjay Sen's Avatar
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    Vaughn and Scott,

    I initially went to the Bostick-Sullivan website to look at the 11x14 frame, and that is when I realized that the image exposure areas are actually larger than the frame size. You are right, getting the bigger frame makes more sense. Plus they also have a 10% off sale until Jan 1, 2008.

    As far as the addiction is concerned, I think it's already too late! After I started using the 8x10 more (didn't have a backpack initially), I get the feeling that 4x5 is too small!


    Best,
    Sanjay

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