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  1. #1
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I recently got a nice deal (i.e.--much less than a Condit punch) on a Kodak Register Punch and 11x14" contact printing frame. I think this setup was designed for some process involved in offset printing or lithography or something of that nature. It also came with a 16" rubber roller in a very impressive metal handle. Eventually I'll probably use it for contrast masking with Ilfochrome or I might try unsharp masking in B&W. The printing frame is in quite good shape, so it was worth the $50 just for that.

    The pins on the frame are placed such that they would have been about an inch outside the film area, which leads me to believe that it must have been used by attaching some sort of acetate or paper strip to the sheets that were being held in registration. Does anyone know what was used for this purpose, and whether or not these strips are made anymore?

  2. #2

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    David,
    I don't know about your particular situation, but what I do in contrast masking 4X5 negatives is to afix a one inch film extension on the end of my camera negative using lithographers tape (1/4 inch width). This then gives me a 4 inch by 6 inch "extended negative". This extension is where I punch my registration holes (to keep from invading the camera negative).

    Since I use lith film as my masks, I cut down 5X7 inch lith film to the same 4X6 inch dimension. I imagine that something similar will work for you in your situation. Lith film is available in a variety of sizes from Photo Warehouse and Freestyle. Hope this helps.
    Art is a step from what is obvious and well-known toward what is arcane and concealed.

    Visit my website at http://www.donaldmillerphotography.com

  3. #3
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Thanks, Donald. That sounds like a start.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    I recently got a nice deal (i.e.--much less than a Condit punch) on a Kodak Register Punch and 11x14" contact printing frame. I think this setup was designed for some process involved in offset printing or lithography or something of that nature. It also came with a 16" rubber roller in a very impressive metal handle. Eventually I'll probably use it for contrast masking with Ilfochrome or I might try unsharp masking in B&W. The printing frame is in quite good shape, so it was worth the $50 just for that.

    The pins on the frame are placed such that they would have been about an inch outside the film area, which leads me to believe that it must have been used by attaching some sort of acetate or paper strip to the sheets that were being held in registration. Does anyone know what was used for this purpose, and whether or not these strips are made anymore?
    In doing a search I came across your inquiry: It was for Kodak's Dye Transfer that included final size separations and "rolling" a dye laden film(s), in register onto the final (print). These matrices could be re-soaked in their dye and placed atop the next paper-base. The film was developed in a tanning developer that effected a 3-D of dye aborbsing thickness. You've surely found this out already but....

  5. #5
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    David, If you still have this set and aren't using it I would be interested in purchasing it, assuming it really is for dye transfer (as it sounds).

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    It's my favorite contact printing frame, and, sorry, it's not for sale.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #7

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    David what you have are some leftovers from the Kodak Dye Transfer Process. The punch was used to punch holes in the three matrices needed for the process but could also be used to register colour separation negatives and masks. The Matrix film would be punched directly where as when registering film for separations or masks a strip of punched film would be attached mask or separation film. If the punch isn't already attached to a board flush with the punch plate it should be. Tyring to punch film otherwise will lead to problems.

    If the printing frame has pins on the glass make sure to keep it because these pins in the glass are hard to come by. If there were no pins that came with the frame or punch you will have to find some. Kodak originally had some on a pin registration bar with the proper distances that correspond to the punch. You should have a better chance in finding these in New York than anywhere else since there was a lot of dye transfer work done there for the advertising industry. To go with the punch there was also a large and small Kodak Vacuum Register Board with the appropriate pins.
    As for the roller it is designed for the Dye Transfer Process. It was used to roll the dyed matrices onto the receiving paper - a very high quality roller.

    Gord

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Thanks for the additional info!
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com



 

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