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  1. #11
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    Is there a reason paraffin sealing or candle wax won't work? Many people use it for batique and then iron with paper overlay to remove later. It's opaque when thick, but seemed translucent enough to me when absorbed into paper. Beeswax seems so sticky to me, but not having done the process, I can't claim to be right.

    There are other types of wax that aren't as easy to get. I got some microcrystalline wax as a sample once because I needed a higher melting point than paraffin wax.


    Murray
    Murray

  2. #12
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    May I ask why beeswax is required? Is it more transparent?

    Thanks

    Murray
    Murray

  3. #13
    Aggie's Avatar
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    http://www.collodion.org/

    I would suggest getting hold of these people since they wax their final products. Supposedly it makes them more archival.

  4. #14

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    murray -

    the reason behind my wanting to wax my prints has nothing to do with archival -issues, but to make the paper more transparant so light will pass through it quicker/easier when i make (positive) prints.

  5. #15

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    Primitive Photography by Alan Greene covers the process of waxing paper negatives
    with bees wax in step by step detail , should give you all the info you need .

  6. #16
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    OK - I have that- I'll go look it up...I wonder if he is intent on using vintage chemistry, and beeswax was perhaps easier to get that paraffin wax.

    It may bee (:O) that paraffin wax just doesn't do it right and that's why.

    Murray
    Murray

  7. #17
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    One thing I know is beeswax is more malleable and will bend easily with the paper whereas paraffin sets harder and had more tendency to flake. I also think the beeswax may be more transparent but really cant say more without a side by side comparison. I've also used a beeswax product called Tackyfinger that has a bit of glycerin mixed in to soften it. It's purpose is to give your fingers better grip with papers when doing things like collating sets of forms. You might try picking some up from the office supply store and see how it works.
    Gary Beasley

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