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Thread: AZO 411

  1. #1
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    Any tips on designing an AZO area for my darkroom?300 or 150w bulb etc? Thanks for any useful 411.
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

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    I print AZO in my garage with a clip on halogen work lamp clipped to the exposed rafter beam, and my contact printing frame sitting on top of a plastic garbage can (the kind with the flat lid) It can be done very cheaply and just about anywhere that is reasonably dim. The only major expense is the paper. I develop in Rodinal (which I also use for my film) with great results and it is quite inexpensive and easy to mix.

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    Same space is needed for a 150 or a 300 watt bulb. All you need is a small, dry, three feet of counter space, and some space above for the light. A clip-on reflector (cost less than $10 will work), but I just use a bare R-40 light bulb. One bulb has lasted now for over 25 years. I prefer a brighter bulb--easier to see through dense negatives to see where to dodge and burn.

    The dry counter where I make the exposure is at the end of the sink; not opposite it. One step. Quick. Easy. Nothing complex or expensive needed at all. The exposure counter top is on the long side of "L" shaped counters. To my left is the voltage regulator and a space to put the boxes of paper. I transfer paper from a 500-sheet box to a 100-sheet box and work out of that. No "paper safes" needed. No wrapping on the paper needed, except for longer term storage--certainly not between each print. Your set up should be such to keep the the work process flowing with minimal wasted motion and time.

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    I use a standard 100 watt bulb with a standard desk lamp reflector about 24 inches above the exposure plane. Nominal exposure time is 30-40 seconds which seems to be about right.

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    Hi

    I use my LPL enlarger for enlargments from 4x5 to 8x10 I get times from 50 seconds to 3 minutes because I don't like to take a 8x10 into the field!
    Good light and nice shadows!

    www.artfoto.ch

  7. #7

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    I have been using the R lamps in 45W and 120W (Ge misers). They are a lot cheaper than the 300W R lamps. I have a fairly standard printing time (proof time) of about 11 seconds with the 45W on grade 2.

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    Would a normal 200-Watt Phillips Classictone spotlightbulb work with AZO and keep the exposure times relatively low, in particular with dense negatives?
    Francesco

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    Francesco, I don't know how close you will have the bulb to the paper, but I found spotlights to be too narrow beamed - flood lights spread the beam properly.

    I'm using a 120-watt now, so 200 should work.
    juan

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    Hi Juan, planning to keep it between 2 to 3 feet above the frame. Whichever gives the best light cover. What height and what kind of times are you starting with using 120 watt?
    Francesco

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