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  1. #11

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    [quote="GreyWolf"]
    I would like to ask you Sandy ... Do you use the green pigment ink quite extensively when you make digital negatives? Would you recommend that an Epson 2200 owner start from the beginning by using the green ink? Should a beginner attempt to cultivate curves to match the printing process with the green ink for the type of negative desired? (i.e. pt/pd, kallitype, cyanotype)

    I don't use the green pigment ink at all in making digital negatives. With the Epson printers that use pigmented ink you can get plenty of density on Pictorico using the black ink. The green ink is for use with printers that use "dye ink", not "pigmented inks."

    In the long run you will get the best results if you develop a curve that is specific to your printer and printing process. However, there are generic curves available for the Epson 2200 for a number of processes and I would recommend that you start with them. I believe you can download curves for several processes, including Pt/Pd, from Burkholder's web site. I have an excellent palladium curve for the Epson 2000P but this printer does not use the same pigmented ink set as your printer and I am not sure how well it would work. But I will be happy to send it to anyone who might like to try it. But this curve definitely would not work with dye printers.

  2. #12
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    Who supplies the Pictorico media?
    Gary Beasley

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas
    Who supplies the Pictorico media?


    www.pictorico.com

  4. #14
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    You can also get the 8.5 X 11 sheets through Amazon for about $16 or $17.
    hi!

  5. #15
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    Great! Thanks, they may also carry a few other things I can use too.
    Gary Beasley

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    Quote Originally Posted by glbeas

    Is that Pictorio film clear enough to use a second sheet with only highlight density enhancements printed on it and registered to the first? May be the only way to get the density using those materials.
    If you have the Epson 2000P or 2200 (or another of the Epson printers that use pigmented inks) you can get plenty of density on Pictorico for AZO and Pt/Pd printing. The 1280 is another matter. I don't know of anyone who has been abole to get enough densisty with this printer on any clear substrate using the black inks. However, you can get enough UV printing density for Pt/Pd with the 1280 by making what are known as spectral negatives , i.e. you use a color that blocks UV radiation more effectively than the black inks. What some have found is that green works best for this printer for spectral negatives, even though I think that Burkholder recommends orange or orange/magenta. In theory orange should block UV light more effectively than green but in practice this does appear to be the case.
    I found out something interesting, the 2200 at least will reregister a sheet for a second pass with great accuracy if you set the guides tight against the sheet at the outset. I was playing with a scan from a 4x5 and output it to some enhanced matte paper, which is pretty dull stuff. I decided to play with it when the mediocre print came out and cut the highlights and most midtones out with levels and ran it through again. The result were encouraging enough to try a third pass with only the blackest shadows left after a levels adjustment. Though the print didn't show stupendous shadow detail when I held it up to the light the tonal range was quite good with lots of detail into the shadows. This tells me that a second pass on transparency should give you any amount of density you want with a little research and experimentation, and the 1280 may be able to do quite a bit better if it can hold the reregisteration.
    I tried it on some luster paper and found by the third pass the ink had sealed in the paper enough to give some problems in the darkest areas with ink absorbtion and left a little dull patch there.
    It'll be interesting to see what happens when I get some transparent media to play with.

  7. #17

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    I've had succes making inkjet negs with the Epson 1280 and OHP for platinum printing. However the Epson 2200 has been problematic. While the density and contrast are fine prints made from the 2200 negs have an overall 'grittiness'. So far I've been unable to correct this.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by rogein
    I've had succes making inkjet negs with the Epson 1280 and OHP for platinum printing. However the Epson 2200 has been problematic. While the density and contrast are fine prints made from the 2200 negs have an overall 'grittiness'. So far I've been unable to correct this.
    I think it must be a question of printer settings. I use the predessor of the Epson 2200, the 2000P, which has lower resolution than the 2200 and my prints from OHP negatives are very smooth and definitely not gritty or grainy.

    Make sure that you are using the following settings (assuming a grayscale file).

    Media = Glossy Paper (not OHP)
    Ink = Color
    Mode = Automatic

    A dialog box should let you know that fast speed printing is turned off and that you are printing in photo, or maximum, resolution.

    Also, use Pictorico. I don't know of any other OHP material that works with the Epson 2200. It is possible that there are others but I have not heard of anyone having success with anything other than Pictorico.

    No point in using profiles here, you just need to be consistent.

  9. #19

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    Sandy,

    Yes, I've tried different paper settings, different curves, etc with the 2200 and the 'grittiness' is still ever present. Colorizing the negs yellow-green seemed to minimize it the most on the 2200 but the 1280 negs are still noticeably smoother. I dunno - maybe it's my water, lightsource, karma.....<g>

  10. #20
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    Rog,

    Are you using OHP or the white film on your 2200? Burkholder suggests you use the white with the 2200. That is what we use. With the 1270/1280, we are using the OHP clear(ish) film.

    Brian.
    hi!

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