Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,205   Posts: 1,531,745   Online: 899
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    9

    Contact printing using a uv-plate burner..

    I can buy these uv-boxes used and new. All seem to have a timer, the first 2 are used, and the last I can buy new. (I want to make contact prints with digital negatives on liquid emulsion.)
    I wonder if they are good for making contact prints..

  2. #2
    glbeas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Roswell, Ga. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,307
    Images
    109
    They are great for alt processes like platinum, salt prints, cyanotype. I think they might be too bright for liquid emulsion.
    Gary Beasley

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Western Masstts. USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    273
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny van Ryswyk View Post
    I can buy these uv-boxes used and new. All seem to have a timer, the first 2 are used, and the last I can buy new. (I want to make contact prints with digital negatives on liquid emulsion.)
    I wonder if they are good for making contact prints..
    I'm not an expert but I have done some of what you're asking about. My suggestion is to contact the manufacturer of the emulsion or uv sensitive material you will be using and give them the specs on type and number of bulbs in the unit you'd like to use. To get this info you may want to contact the manufacturer/supplier of the tubes (visit the website?) to get the spectral output characteristics.

    Enjoy!
    "Get over it."

  4. #4
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,372
    Images
    4
    Those aren't 'plate burners' - they are low-end exposure units for printed circuit boards and for DIY labels. The double sided one is for double sided printed circuit boards.

    They are not a good choice for your purpose.
    • Liquid Light is not a UV emulsion.
    • They have poor contact pressure.
    • The light is uncollimated.


    Use a standard spring back contacting frame and a small light bulb hanging about 3 feet above the frame.

    A plate burner will have a vacuum blanket to clamp the materials together and the light source will be a mercury vapor or HID lamp that is several feet from the frame. The smallest are about the size of a washing machine. There are also overhead units with the light above the contacting frame and a curtain that pulls around to shield you from the light.

    There are boxes that are similar to plate burners made for exposing silk screens. The blanket system is not designed for flat a/w but for silk screen frames. Some of these units use banks of flourescent bulbs.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Lindan View Post

    Use a standard spring back contacting frame and a small light bulb hanging about 3 feet above the frame.
    Nicholas, what kind of light bulb do you recommend?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Western Masstts. USA
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    273
    Nicholas-

    Of course you're right but couldn't Dan hang one of the units pictured, with it's timer, in place of a single bulb?

    -Rudy
    "Get over it."

  7. #7
    Nicholas Lindan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Cleveland, Ohio USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,372
    Images
    4
    The standard bulb used for contacting is a 7 1/2 watt round style. If you can find one nuArc made the CP25 point source contacting light that's quite nice: timer, adjustable brightness, VC filter holder on the lamp housing (though it wants 3" gels, not standard under-lens filters) - if you wait long enough you can usually find one for $25 or so.

    For exposure control you can use an enlarger timer. Adams used a footswitch and metronome and he did a dance with his hands above the contact frame for dodging and burning.
    DARKROOM AUTOMATION
    f-Stop Timers - Enlarging Meters
    http://www.darkroomautomation.com/da-main.htm

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Hamilton, Ont, Canada
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,001
    Or cobble a open bottomed box together and sit it on top of the Aqua blue one and set the spring back contact frame on top face side down. How high the box is will determine how far away from the light your print is (needs to be).
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    Sub 35mm
    Posts
    9
    Great info, thank you all so far, very helpful.

  10. #10
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,780
    Silver emulsions are far too fast, and these units would have too much unpredictability on start up for any kind of consistency, as full exposure would likely be reached just after striking, for these to be of use for liquid light or similar silver based emulsions.

    For silver contact printing I use my unfocused enlarger as a light source. Very controllable, allowing for stopping down to extend exposure times, which is more often what is needed.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin