Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,986   Posts: 1,524,036   Online: 880
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,412
    Images
    2

    Contact Printing from a Television....

    Hey all,

    This post might be better in alternative processes, but technically what I'm dreaming up is 'contact printing' so alas, here it is!

    In my opinion, the vivid reds, greens & blues of a traditional CRT television tube are the post-modern equivalent to stained glass windows, and I've always wanted to get a perfect 1:1 image from it, with quality good enough to discern the individual pixels.

    There are many technical hurdles to overcome, like getting a stable image, figuring out how to turn the TV on without the initial ZAP destroying the image. And so forth.

    It's a crazy idea, I know, but if anyone has some ideas or suggestions or duragatory comments, I'd love to hear them.

    Thanks,

    Chris H.

  2. #2
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Royal Oak, MI
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,755
    Images
    41
    Crazy idea - I like it!
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Holland and Brazil
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,066
    Get one channel with the picture you want and one channel that is completely black.
    In that way you can turn on your tv without fogging your paper.

    As for the other one: how about a DVD or so ?

    Peter

  4. #4
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Royal Oak, MI
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,755
    Images
    41
    Heck, you could make a DVD with your image on it, and time it so when it plays you get like 1 minute of black, then the image for your exposure time, then more black. DVD shutter!
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  5. #5
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,412
    Images
    2
    aaahhh, both are great ideas. DVD shutter, beautiful. I was also thinking about fading the picture out using the various knobs (picture, contrast, brightness..... [it's definitely an old school television]).

    Now how about exposure times? I guess trial & error is the only option really.

  6. #6
    Jeff Bannow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Royal Oak, MI
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,755
    Images
    41
    You'll want some slow paper to work with - Cyanotypes maybe? Standard color or B&W paper would be too fast I would think ...
    - Jeff (& sometimes Eva, too) - http://www.jeffbannow.com

  7. #7
    keithwms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Charlottesville, Virginia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,079
    Blog Entries
    20
    Images
    129
    Very cool ideas, do it! I'd be inclined to photograph the TV on large format and contact print that slide or neg. Reason being the flicker and the static, and the issue of how to define the exposure time- the response likely won't be fast enough to define short exposure, you might aim more for 5 or 10 sec exposure. But simply photographing the screen would fix all of these problems easily. I know it's not as cool, but...
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

    [APUG Portfolio] [APUG Blog] [Website]

  8. #8
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,412
    Images
    2
    Imagine this, contact straight to Ilfochrome. You'd have a beautiful first generation print straight from the TV. I think this could look really cool. Also, I'd like to use slide dupe film sheets and get a 1:1 transparency, then mount that in a light box that looked like a tv and you'd have a completely functional STATIC IMAGINE TV, hahaha. Once I get my darkroom set up, I'll definitely try this!

  9. #9
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    482
    I tried a similar thing with a pinhole camera setup to capture the full screen on a B/W paper negative (but you could use panchro and color film, of course.) I used a pinhole sized about the same as the pixel size of the video screen, since you don't really need any more sharpness than what you're limited to by the video pixels themselves; plus, larger pinholes mean shorter exposure times.

    During last year's US presidential election I recorded several hours of the election night coverage, then reviewed them and freeze-framed the appropriate footage where I like the compositions. Some of the most interesting freeze-frame images were during dissolves from one scene to another, for instance the face of an adoring fan dissolving to candidate Obama's face, etc. Lots of interesting dichotomies to play with, subject matter wise.

    Once the appropriate freeze-framed image is selected, you can then set up the pinhole camera and capture it on film.

    ~Joe

    PS: You can calculate with good accuracy the correct distance from the video screen to the pinhole on the camera to get the video image to nearly fill the film's frame, by using the following ratios. Assuming your video aspect ratio isn't the same as the film's, just use the figures for the video screen's width and the film's longest dimension. You supply three of the following values, and solve for the fourth. Most likely you already know your video screen's width, and the film size you wish to use, so you're left to decide on the camera's focal length and/or the required distance from the screen to the pinhole.

    (width of video screen)/(distance from video screen to pinhole) = (width of film)/(focal length of pinhole camera)
    Last edited by Joe VanCleave; 08-14-2009 at 12:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    3

    Copyright Issue

    I would point out that a great deal of the content on television is subject to copyright, eg, TV shows, DVDs, etc. I would, therefore, suggest great caution in deciding what content to copy.

    Evans

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin