Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,449   Posts: 1,570,074   Online: 909
      
Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 95
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,823
    Images
    24
    have fun contact printing,
    i get my negatives bullet proof ( like mortenson suggests )
    and do long exposures with regular enlarging paper and a 300w bulb.
    long exposures meaning 100-120seconds ...
    contact prints can be really special ...

    ====

    if you are doing darkroom work at home
    go to home depot and get 5gal homer buckets
    to store your spent chemicals in.
    not all darkroom chemicals are coffee and laundry detergent ...
    find out what might be right to dispose of your darkroom waste safely and legally in your area ...
    in some places pouring then down the drain might not be the best thing to do ...
    you can get something called a silver magnet ( i may be selling / distributing them within a month or so )
    it is small 40-45$ unit that will plate out up to 30 troy oz of silver from your spent fix. ...

    when it is dry ... mail it to the company (pouch sold with the unit ) and they mail you a check
    not for all 30oz but just about all of it ... no minimums no hassles - they send in bulk
    so there is never a minimum ... ( and silver prices seem to be going up )

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,425
    Images
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    Fomalux 312 falls into the same category, right? (Except for being RC rather than FB---but it's a chloride paper that Foma describe as "contact speed", which I assume means "in the same league as Azo and Lodima".) That's what I've been using to avoid the unreasonably short times with enlarging paper---with a 7.5W bulb, usually a bit over a metre from the negative, a typical exposure time is a minute or a little less.

    I have no real idea how *good* the Foma paper is---I don't think I have a developed enough eye yet for paper nuances---but it's cheap, convenient, and slow.

    -NT
    It's hard to say if the speed is comparable to Azo and Lodima without doing a side by side test with the same neg and light source at the same distance. Lodima seems to be a bit faster than Azo. If your exposure time is in the 15-90 second range, you're good.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #13
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3,190
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    It's hard to say if the speed is comparable to Azo and Lodima without doing a side by side test with the same neg and light source at the same distance. Lodima seems to be a bit faster than Azo. If your exposure time is in the 15-90 second range, you're good.
    This depends on the negative. I have negatives that I expose identically on the two papers, and I have negatives where there is an order of magnitude difference in the exposure times between the two papers.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    This depends on the negative. I have negatives that I expose identically on the two papers, and I have negatives where there is an order of magnitude difference in the exposure times between the two papers.
    I have found pretty much the same thing when printing the same negative on both Azo and Lodima.

  5. #15
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,995
    Images
    1
    Does anyone have a reccomendation for a printing frame? Right now I'd be looking for an 8x10 frame, or 8.25x10.25 so there's a little play room...

    How do the old ones work, like eht auction site listings? Is the glass something to worry about? Will I need anti-newton glass?

    I've been doing some research into just building my own. Using my friends woodshop . What type of wood, oak, ash, cherry? I'm guessing a hardwood, and I'm leaning towards red oak or something hard, yet something that can carry a clean edge so it won't splinter....

    any suggestions?


  6. #16
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,425
    Images
    20
    One that's somewhat oversized is good. You want the kind with a split back and leaf springs hinged with a pin at the center, not with spring clips all around the perimeter. The latter type don't give even pressure in the center, in my experience. There is a frame made by Premier that is usually orange--avoid that one. The construction is a bit light. My favorite print frame is a frame sold by Kodak for dye transfer printing--very sturdy with anti-reflective glass. Old frames made by Century, Korona, Grundlach, and such are often good frames, but sometimes the corners may need to be reglued.

    Anti-Newton or anti-reflective glass are ideal. Whether you actually need it will depend on your film usually. If the film base has a retouching surface, which is often the case with sheet film, you may not need A-N or AR glass.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #17
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,995
    Images
    1
    ok david,

    right now the films I'm using are tmy-2 and efke 25. Thankfully both of these are still available in 8x10, so I'm trying to get a box here and there when my budget can allow it. Right now I'm up to 4 boxes of tmy2 and 2 boxes of efke 25. I might run some through my paint-can pinhole camera to see how things look, and can give me something to experiment with . At least until I have an 8x10 up and running.

    Do you know if there is a "vacuum" easel that doesn't have to actually be attached to a vacuum, rather, using some sort of pump to suck the air out?


  8. #18
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,995
    Images
    1
    I've been thinking too about using aluminum to make the frame. Wood, because it is prone to warping and humidity changes, where as metal is not (at least not enough in this case ).

    basically, I'd be looking to make a contact frame like this one

    http://cgi.ebay.com/10-1-2-x-8-1-2-C...3286.m20.l1116

    just in aluminum, and probably powdercoated or anodized to minimize reflections.

    what do you guys think?


  9. #19
    MenacingTourist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    New Jersey
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    895
    Images
    30
    My advice is to not make things harder than they have to be.

    Making your own contact printing frame (wood or metal) is fun and it's great to use tools you made yourself but it does take a good bit of time. I made mine in several sizes (all oversized) with dovetailed joints, brass hardware, etc. If you have access to a shop and know how to make them cool. Just plan on triple the time you think it will take. As far as wood vs. metal...humidity isn't going to be that big a deal with a contact printing frame.

    In the meantime you should be able to get cheap-ish frames off ebay for under $20 or so. Another option is to keep using the heavy glass sandwich and make a cut-out mask from rubylith. I've used all three options with success. The last one is by far the simplest.

    The important thing is to have fun and it sounds like you have that covered.

    Alan.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    SE.London
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    547
    Dan, like you I really love contact prints and contact printing. May I recommend, 'Darkroom 2' published by Lustrum Press (1978). Out of print but avialable on the S/H market. There's a wonderful section by Cole Weston on printing his fathers negatives. He used light bulbs from 7.5 watts to 60 watts for contact printing on the faster bromide papers designed for projection printing. Edward Weston used 100 to 500 watts for contact printing on the much slower silver chloride papers.

    I've been using Lodima which others have refered to and for me it is just beautiful. For this I use an over sized light bulb, 125mm dia.(this gives me a very even illumination) and 150 watts at a distance of 20" which gives me exposures of 20 + seconds. I've attached it to an old lens panel for my enlarger and I can vary the hight to either increase or decrese the exposure time. It is also wired to an enlarger timer which is certainly not necessary but I like to use so I can easily 'dodge and burn' while it counts down.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20090911_0055_1.jpg  
    Last edited by Trevor Crone; 09-28-2009 at 03:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.

Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin