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  1. #31
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    this thread has garnered so many views, I never knew I could start something that would grow so big so fast !


  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielStone View Post
    any recommendations for a proper light bulb for the exposing lamp? frosted or clear? what wattage to start? ge, phillips, other?

    right now the films and papers I'll be using will be tmy-2 and acros in 4x5. Nothing yet in 8x10 , I don't have the camera yet . I'll be using ilford matte fb paper, as well as slavich single weight, and EMAKS G3.

    please advise

    thanks

    Dan
    If you are going to use enlarging paper then a 7.5 - 15 watt bulb is fine. When I attended a workshop taught by Cole Weston I saw something you might be interested in. He had built a little "box" to hold the low wattage frosted bulb. The box was open at the bottom so the light can project onto the paper. The box had a shelf at the bottom that held kodak polycontrast filters so he could easily use variable contrast paper by just sliding a filter in. The box was mounted on an arm that extended from the wall. An yes, he used it to print from Edward's negatives as he was using enlarging paper at the time. The small bulb needed for enlarging paper can be enclosed this way as they don't give off much heat.

    I use a 150 watt frosted reflector flood for Azo and Lodima and my enlarger for contact printing on enlarging paper.

    Henry

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    Hey, this guy is going to fit in here really well.

    When I was a kid I'd get bored with TV, and everyone thought I was weird. I haven't owned a TV since 1974, although I did agree a few decades ago that when high definition got here I'd give in. We may be at that point now.

    I didn't have a tv when I got out of the service('68) until my girlfriend moved in with me '73ish. I still don't turn it on until after 6pm.

    Ummm...... Crap in Hi-Def is still crap.
    Last edited by John Koehrer; 09-30-2009 at 10:29 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #34
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    I use a type "S-11" bulb for contact printing onto enlarging paper. 7.5 watts, frosted white, miniature round globe on a standard sized socket.

    Totally off-subject, but the main reason I haven't "bit the bullet" for a new TV is that I can't stand to look at 4:3 program material stretched horizontally on a 16:9 screen. Despite the US having passed the date of the shutdown of NTSC (except for some low-power stations) most live broadcasts, including live sports, are still broadcast in 4:3 aspect ratio. And most legacy programs (with the exception of network prime time shows from the last few years) are also 4:3. As is most local programming. But I can't find a 4:3 flat screen TV larger than about 20" in size. I know most 16:9 sets permit displaying "shrunken" at 4:3, but then the image isn't much larger than my current CRT set. So I don't see the point, except for perhaps watching DVDs.

    Oh well; gonna keep the CRT running a few more years, I guess.

    ~Joe

  5. #35

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    You don't need a fancy contact printing frame just get a piece of 1/4 inch glass from a glass store- it will only cost a few bucks.
    art is about managing compromise

  6. #36

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    make yourself a dimmer switch
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

    website
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  7. #37

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    A dimmer switch sounds like agood idea; but does add a level of complexity that may not be repeatable. If you could do it in increments like f stops with assurance of accuracy, may be worth pursueing.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  8. #38
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
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    The problem with dimmer switches is that as you reduce the voltage to an incandescent filament lamp the color temperature goes down, toward the red, making control of contrast much more problematic. Plus, the added complexity of a dimmer switch is just over-engineering what's really a simple solution. Go to the big-box hardware store, the specialty lamp section, and get an S-11 frosted white bulb. The globe is about the size and color of a table tennis (ping pong for use oldsters) ball. Will fit in any standard 110vac lamp socket. 7.5 watts. Suspend it a fixed distance above the darkroom table. Calibrate, etc.

    Okay, in all fairness to those who like to over-engineer things, the right way to over-engineer this is 1) use a constant voltage transformer or, better yet, a high-end power conditioner intended for use on computers. This will obviate any voltage fluctuation caused by when the electric clothes drier kicks on, for instance. Then, 2) use a duty-cycle chopping motor speed controller, of the type using a power MOSFET. These operate by keeping the peak voltage constant, and instead chopping (or shortening) the duty cycle of the sine wave. No more color temperature changes with intensity adjustments. And 3) a Chinese-made diesel powered electrical generator, planted on its own concrete pad out in the backyard, is also an attractive option, lending one the ability to contact print "off the grid", enabling the continuation of traditional photography during power blackouts, when those undergoing the Digital Way are smacking the sides of their blackened monitor screens. Diesel is especially good because the large fuel tank stores safely, no flammable vapors. You may have a problem when contact printing early in the morning or late at night, unless you install the optional "Emperor Kung Pao" muffler system, available now at dealers everywhere, don't delay call now.

    The problem is, this ain't how EW would have done it, now is it?

    ~Joe
    Last edited by Joe VanCleave; 10-06-2009 at 01:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #39
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    Well guys,

    still no answer from my dad on whether I can actually go ahead with this or not, but I've been amassing materials to get started !

    went to wal-mart the other night and picked up two of the 6.95 clamp lights, 150w max, and a 2.98 GE 7.5 watt bulb(frosted of course).

    I've got trays from a generous person who donated their darkroom materials to me many moons ago, so I've also got a timer that I can plug the light into.

    otherwise, the only thing I guess I'm missing would either be the piece of heavy glass, or the contact frame. that I can wait on, otherwise I'm ready.

    thanks for all the help, please leave a message or a reply if something else piques your brain on this subject

    blessings,

    Dan


  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe VanCleave View Post

    Totally off-subject, but the main reason I haven't "bit the bullet" for a new TV is that I can't stand to look at 4:3 program material stretched horizontally on a 16:9 screen. Despite the US having passed the date of the shutdown of NTSC (except for some low-power stations) most live broadcasts, including live sports, are still broadcast in 4:3 aspect ratio. And most legacy programs (with the exception of network prime time shows from the last few years) are also 4:3. As is most local programming. But I can't find a 4:3 flat screen TV larger than about 20" in size. I know most 16:9 sets permit displaying "shrunken" at 4:3, but then the image isn't much larger than my current CRT set. So I don't see the point, except for perhaps watching DVDs.

    Oh well; gonna keep the CRT running a few more years, I guess.

    ~Joe
    The HiDef TV's you have seen are owned by lazy people, who either don't care or don't know that the TV's have a display mode to view 4:3 programs in correct aspect ratio. You will probably not even see this in the stores, because they want to "fill" the screen with the picture, no matter what program is on view. Trust me, you do not have to view 4:3 flat screen material in "stretch" mode. You can view it "windowboxed" in correct porportions.



 

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