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  1. #11
    Doc W's Avatar
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    I have a really nice split-back frame (Zone VI) but I don't want to use it. It involves extra steps and I want something extremely simple, i.e., put the paper on the easel, put the negative over it, put the glass on top of that, without the negative and paper getting out of alignment. The glass I use is quite heavy. It definitely holds everthing in place. The problem is that the paper is not exactly flat. When I put the glass on the neg/paper, it moves around a little in the process of being flattened. It is not completely out of whack - I still get all of the negative in the print - it is just kind of annoying that it is askew. It looks sloppy.

    All I want is a simple little "guide" that would keep the neg and paper together when I plop the glass on it so I don't have to screw around in the dark. My basic philosophy is the less of that, the better. I have to plop the glass on several times in order to get it straight, which increases the possibility of dust, fingerprints, smudges.

    I guess I am going to have to make something, which probably won't be too difficult. I just wondered if anyone else had done such a thing so I could benefit from their experience, but I am guessing that is not the case. I will report back when I get it made and then patent it and become a millionaire by selling it to the legions of those who contact print 8x10 negatives. Ok, that second part probably isn't gonna happen.

  2. #12

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    How about just using an 8x10 picture frame, turn it upside down, and put the guts in backwards or use one of the leftover 8x10 cardboards, like the ones that Ilford puts into their paper packages, as a backing. Then drop in the paper, then neg, then glass on top. To get it apart, just slide the frame off of the easle and push everything out from the bottom.

    Should be pretty simple and cheap or free depending on how well stocked you are on frames.

  3. #13

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    A 1/4 inch of flat foam on the underside of the print seems to allow me to hinge the glass down and trap the top a bit but still allow adjustment before fully droppong the glass
    "There are a great many things I am in doubt about at the moment, and I should consider myself favoured if you would kindly enlighten me. Signed, Doubtful, off to Canada." (BJP 1914).

    Regards
    Bill

  4. #14

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    Alistair Inglis makes exactly the kind of contact frame that you need. It is a front loading frame with guides that assure easy and quick alignment of the negative and paper. Moreover, the frame holds the negative and paper in amazingly secure contact assuring that your prints will be as sharp as possible. Those of us who deal with Alistair can attest to his honesty. Moreover, everything he makes is of premium quality, and backed by his word-which means, of course, that you never have to worry about what you purchase from him. I have used the back loading split backed frames. The Inglis contact frame is much superior.

    http://www.alistairinglis.com/inglis_contact.htm

    Let us know how you make out, and best wishes.

    Ed

  5. #15
    Doc W's Avatar
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    PeteZ8 and Ed: good suggestions, from two ends of the economic spectrum. I will definitely give the frame idea a whirl. The Inglis solution is out of my league at this point even though he does indeed have a reputation for high quality. The pin idea with his contact frame attracts me since I expect I will be using masks at some point. I may look at that for the long term.

  6. #16

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    Saw something that would work..

    At Garden ridge pottery - It's a "floating frame" whereby one sheet of glass is surrounded by a wooded frame that has some depth to it, a second sheet of glass has a similar wooden frame that fits inside the bigger wooden frame. The idea is that you could place a picture in between the two panes of glass and it would "float" with the transparent glass as a sort of mat,

    It appeared that some woodscrews in the outer wooden frame with some washers from the hardware store would compress the inner frame, and therefore the two panes of glass, together, making a pretty good contact print frame. $13 for a 11X14, I think $20 for a 14x17. I almost bought one, but I didn't want to be seen purchasing something from Garden ridge. That and gear acquisition syndrome has me contemplating the purchase of a larger camera, so I wasn't sure what size I wanted.

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