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  1. #21

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    Denise, it could indeed be accomplished easily; I actually took that a stage further and figured that it would be perfectly possible to have a larger printing frame and some inserts to allow you to choose what to print
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  2. #22

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    I'd certainly be interested in hearing about what you come up with, I think it's a very good idea - I recently bought an antique frame which is lovely but would have/ would definitely looked at a modern one also

  3. #23

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    What sort / size would interest you most catem? Are you printing from plate glass, or film / paper negatives?

    Another quick question for anybody to answer... how thick is the felt used on the backing plates? I've found a source of good quality felt, ranging from 3mm to 6mm+ in thickness. Also, do you think there is any advantage in using black felt over green, or beige, or any other colour?
    Last edited by vickersdc; 12-08-2009 at 11:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
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  4. #24

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    David,

    The frame I have is a full plate frame for glass plates but I have window glass in it for film/ paper negatives - so I would be looking for something larger than this for paper or film (if I get around to glass I'd be using the one I have I reckon) - so probably 10 x 8 would be the smallest size that would interest me - the idea of a frame that's quite large (but not too unwieldy) with inserts sounds good. Sorry if that's not specific enough. I need to do a bit more to know exactly what would be best - but I do think you'd find interest as I didn't find a lot of choice when I started looking.
    Cate

  5. #25

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    Well, I've made a start on manufacturing a traditional contact printing frame for print-out-papers.

    Here you can see one of the stainless steel leaf springs, and the four brass knobs that I turned on the lathe today. The threaded inserts for the wood have arrived, and I'm hoping that I might get an hour or so in the workshop over the weekend to start on the Oak frame.


    Cheers,
    David.
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  6. #26
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    David,

    The felt on my two from Bostick & Sullivan frames is 4mm thick. B&S sells these, but I understand they are built by a neighboring business. Bill Schwab's 7x17 felt is 3mm. The two from B&S have been used very little. The 7x17 has probably been used 600-700 times. This may have flattened the felt a bit. Both builders used black felt.

    Your machined knobs are beautiful. Can you explain the frame design you have in mind? On my three the ends of the spring go into cuts or grooves on the interior sides of the frame. To do that with yours, the knob edges would prevent the ends of the spring going into the cuts. How does your design function?

    John

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The normal arrangement that John is describing has the leaf springs attached to the back in the center of the spring usually with a rivet that has large flat heads, and it is free to swivel. There are grooves in the inside edges of the frame, and you push the ends of the leaf spring into the grooves as you rotate the spring to hold the back in place. This mechanism is fairly quick to operate, so it is easy to open half the back and check progress when printing out and close it again as needed without disturbing the registration of the print and the negative.

    There is one downside that your design alleviates, which is that with extremely long exposures, the rivet can get warm and leave an artifact on the print, but generally one learns to avoid such long exposures. On the other hand, with a spring that is held in place at the ends as yours appears to be, I would be concerned about the spring bowing up in the center and not applying enough pressure.
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  8. #28

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    The idea was to have a leaf spring that is held down at either end, achieved by tightening down on a knurled brass knob at either end. The reason I wanted to do this was to allow those people who may have difficulty in getting the normal leaf springs in position. My way is slower for sure, but I'm hoping easier for those who might have some issues with manual dexterity.

    As for the leaf spring bowing up in the middle... it will still be screwed into the back so will not rise up in the middle. All will become clear when I get to building that bit! The brass knobs are only resting on the spring in that image, they will not be fixed to it; instead, the leaf spring will have a slot cut into it at either end to allow the threaded portion of the knob to fit through.

    Here's a quick drawing of the cross-section that I hope will make it clearer...


    Cheers,
    David.
    Last edited by vickersdc; 12-11-2009 at 03:52 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added the diagram.
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  9. #29
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vickersdc View Post
    Here you can see one of the stainless steel leaf springs, and the four brass knobs that I turned on the lathe today. The threaded inserts for the wood have arrived, and I'm hoping that I might get an hour or so in the workshop over the weekend to start on the Oak frame.
    They look good. Where did you get your spring material from?

    I must get my lathe running again but I have been spoiled recently with the use of the CNC machine at work which also handles oak very well! (see panoramic camera link in my signature line).


    Steve.

  10. #30
    2F/2F's Avatar
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    I would be interested in a 5x7 version. (See my recent wanted ad in the classified section.)
    2F/2F

    "Truth and love are my law and worship. Form and conscience are my manifestation and guide. Nature and peace are my shelter and companions. Order is my attitude. Beauty and perfection are my attack."

    - Rob Tyner (1944 - 1991)

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