Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,818   Posts: 1,581,647   Online: 813
      
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 40
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    297
    I would not do every shot on the roll. I average 3 or 4 usable shots per roll, so what I thought was yes to perhaps use pnance's method above, but only do the usable shots, plus a couple more. Say, 6 images on an 8x10. I'll still have the regular contact sheet to refer to, but I always wanted to see the select few just a little bigger and apart from the rest of the roll. A contact sheet of the primary edit, if you will, but a little larger than normal. Should be relatively quick to do with the RH Designs analyzer pro. In any case I'll be trying something similar soon, I have a Durst Comask coming in the post, with its 4 windows I'll be trying to get 4 images on a sheet of 8x10. Mind you, I didn't really have this in mind when I bought it. Anyway, shall see how it goes. Well, call me mad, but aren't we all considered to be something like mad professors in these dark rooms of ours that hardly anybody these days understands? Paul

  2. #22
    Joe VanCleave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    488
    If the idea is to find a quick way to get proof prints, it sounds like a Beseller Negatrans would speed up the process. And instead of an enlarged contact sheet, why not just do small proof prints of each negative? Pick a negative whose density is mid-range within all the images on the roll, find the (roughly) optimal f/stop and exposure time for that one image's print, then run them all at one setting, quick and dirty as they say. Start with 8"x10" paper, cut them in half and print full-frame on 5"x8". You can put the exposed proof prints back into a light-tight envelop after exposure, then develop them all in one batch in an oversized tray (like for 11"x14") after all the images have been exposed, thus saving lotsa time.

    When you get experienced with this method, you can tweak individual negatives "on the fly" for density differences, for instance adding or subtracting exposure time, to get a proof print that's "closer" to optimal.

    There's also the question of "what's wrong with an 8"x10" contact proof sheet of the whole roll?" since this method has served photographers for generations.

    ~Joe

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    880
    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874 View Post
    Buy a very large camera (20x24) and make contact prints, one image at a time.

    John Powers
    LOL
    John Bowen

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    297
    now I get it....

  5. #25
    EASmithV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,885
    Blog Entries
    4
    Images
    123
    Quote Originally Posted by jgjbowen View Post
    LOL
    lolol
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  6. #26
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    You can make a proofing enlarger pretty easily, or buy one from an outfit like Glenview:
    http://www.glennview.com/810.htm
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    464
    Images
    6
    They are projection proofs. You can do 35mm, 9 frames at a time using a 4x5 enlarger. A glass negative carrier is needed. Align the 9 frames in the carrier, insert it in the enlarger and project them onto your paper of whatever size you want. Look good and works well. Very easy to do.

    If you want a full roll of 35mm film done at one time you will need an 8x10 to 10x10 enlarger to do so.

    Other than aligning the negatives in the glass carrier it is no different than making a normal enlargement from a negative. Use a glass carrier to make sure the negatives are flat. If not the curvature of some will make it impossible to get a sharp image of the negative.

  8. #28
    rcam72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Port Chester, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    104
    Images
    1
    I'm a little late to the party but I just came across this in B and H's used section:

    Saunders 8x10" Professional Multi-Print Enlarging Easel Mfr # 155031

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...Enlarging.html

    "With this easel, you can produce multiple images on a single sheet of 8x10" paper. It's light-tight so focusing, cropping, or changing negatives or filter settings are easily done under a dim white light (25W max). Comes with masks for making two 5x7", four 4x5", four 31/2x5", eight 21/2x31/2"(wallet-size) prints (all with borders). Leave the mask off to print a single 8x10". Click-stop control knobs position the paper on a moving carriage for each consecutive exposure.

    • Multiple prints on a single sheet without moving the easel
    • Easel remains stationary while paper carrier moves
    • Accepts standard 8x10" paper and comes complete with a full set of light-tight hinged cup masks
    • Cups are recessed to the focal plane to permit accurate focusing withthe paper in the easel
    • Prints (8) wallets, (4) 31/2x5", (2) 5x7", (1) 8x10" all with borders
    "

    It sounds like something the OP was looking for.

  9. #29
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    Quote Originally Posted by rcam72 View Post
    I'm a little late to the party but I just came across this in B and H's used section:

    Saunders 8x10" Professional Multi-Print Enlarging Easel Mfr # 155031
    This is looking like the kind of setup school photographers would have used to make these sheets where you had one 5x7, a few 3x4, and a load of 2x3 or some similar combination.

    I always hated cutting all these bloody pictures!
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  10. #30
    Greg Davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Crestview Hills, KY
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,950
    I used one of these as a studio's darkroom tech to make wallet size prints. 8 per sheet, and 2 5x7's per sheet. They work well for quick multi-printing, but I have never tried using one to make test prints of varying exposure, nor as a means of making enlarged contacts. It would take forever to make enlarged contacts using one, in fact.
    www.gregorytdavis.com

    Did millions of people suddenly disappear? This may have an answer.

    "No one knows that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father." -Matthew 24:36

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin