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  1. #11
    mobtown_4x5's Avatar
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    God bless this discussion.

    I knew there was a viable way to do this with silver.

    I have some 8x10 Ortho and am looking forward to attempting 4x5 to 8x10 for my first go at platinum and POP.
    Nice job APUG'ers

    Matt

  2. #12

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    Reversal process....

    In Ed's site there is also another article called "Less is more" where they explain how to make direct positives (IOW no internegative) with Ortho film. SOunds like a great process for those of you who want to try and enlarge negatives for alt processes. I must confess I was tempted to try it, but I am too lazy, so decided to buy the big cameras...

    Talk about shooting yourself in the foot....lol......

  3. #13
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    wow
    this is alot of helpful info. Im eager to try some of it out.
    (hoping that somewhere in town sells sheets of ortho film)

  4. #14
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    On another thread, someone suggested developing ortho film in very-weak Dektol, like 1:15 for 90 seconds or so. Since my first shot at inter-positives on Ilford Ortho were too contrasty, this sounds good to me. The Ilford literature recommended only film developers and didn't mention Dektol. I'll give this a try next. Anyone have any experience with this? How about Rodinal 1:200 or something like that?

    Thanks.

    -Mike

  5. #15
    clay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    On another thread, someone suggested developing ortho film in very-weak Dektol, like 1:15 for 90 seconds or so. Since my first shot at inter-positives on Ilford Ortho were too contrasty, this sounds good to me. The Ilford literature recommended only film developers and didn't mention Dektol. I'll give this a try next. Anyone have any experience with this? How about Rodinal 1:200 or something like that?

    Thanks.

    -Mike
    There is also Dave Soemarko's LC-1 Developer which can be tailored for specific contrast requirements:

    http://members.aol.com/fotodave/Articles/LC-1.html

  6. #16
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    I see his formula is for 'lith' films. They are a lot more 'contrasty' than ortho films, aren't they, or are ortho and lith the same thing? I always thought lith film was used for things like photographing text and used in making circut boards. I will try my ortho with Dektol highly diluted and see how it goes....

    -Mike

  7. #17
    Aggie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    On another thread, someone suggested developing ortho film in very-weak Dektol, like 1:15 for 90 seconds or so. Since my first shot at inter-positives on Ilford Ortho were too contrasty, this sounds good to me. The Ilford literature recommended only film developers and didn't mention Dektol. I'll give this a try next. Anyone have any experience with this? How about Rodinal 1:200 or something like that?

    Thanks.

    -Mike
    fresh film will have more contrast to it. What I do is actually hold it out to be exp0sed to the safe lights for a while. Or barring standing there like the statue of liberty for upward of 20 minutes, I have used a sytrofoam cup over the enlarger lens. This subdues the light and gently adds some flashing to the film. You can do tests to see how long you need to flash the film this way to get the flatness you want.

    As for Dektol I found that a tray that had been used for years as a paper developer tray that had a residue of old dektol built up on it, was the greatest thing to develop the ortho film in. I just added water no developer and it was just enough to process the film in 90 seconds. barring this I saved some old developer that was nearly exhasuted and used it.

    I keep a watch for old ortho/copy film on ebay. The stuff that is about 30 years old is great. Nice flat interpositives with it. Also the stuff on ebay is about 1/4 the price of the new ortho film. I currently have a stock pile of around 500 4x5 sheets that I do not refrigerate. I want it to not be contrasty. The opposite holds true for the final negative. You want the contrast. Just be careful and do not over do the contrast.

    I've added two examples of an interpositive. One is the final positive, the other is the test strip to see what exposure I wanted. each incriment is 1 second.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikewhi
    I see his formula is for 'lith' films. They are a lot more 'contrasty' than ortho films, aren't they, or are ortho and lith the same thing? I always thought lith film was used for things like photographing text and used in making circut boards. I will try my ortho with Dektol highly diluted and see how it goes....

    -Mike
    Yes, he designed it for lith films, but the neat thing about it is the variable contrast you can get by mixing the A and B parts in different proportions. It sounded like you needed lower contrast than you were getting, so this formula came to mind. YMMV

  9. #19
    mikewhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aggie
    As for Dektol I found that a tray that had been used for years as a paper developer tray that had a residue of old dektol built up on it, was the greatest thing to develop the ortho film in. I just added water no developer and it was just enough to process the film in 90 seconds. barring this I saved some old developer that was nearly exhasuted and used it.
    Great <insert sarcasm>. Something new to watch for on eBay - a 20 year old tray with Dektol residue. Thanks to your post, it'll probably go for $500. Hang onto any that you have and submit numerous posts on the 'net about how great they are and you'll build up a demand. Then, put it up on eBay and stand back!

    Seriously, though.....

    I am intending on printing directly from my interpositive onto silver paper so that I get a negative image on the print. I am not going to make an enlarged negative. I have a lot of images that look much better as negative images than they do as positives. You can checkout the critique gallery for 3 that I posted or look at my member gallery to see what I mean.

    Even still, I'm amazed at how low contrast the interpositive needs to be to pull a print that I want. I made what looked like a slightly low contrast interpositive on Ilford Ortho and Grade 2 Azo in Dektol 1:3 could barely handle
    the contrast.

    -Mike

  10. #20
    mikewhi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clay
    Yes, he designed it for lith films, but the neat thing about it is the variable contrast you can get by mixing the A and B parts in different proportions. It sounded like you needed lower contrast than you were getting, so this formula came to mind. YMMV
    Hi Clay: I do appreciate the info very much. I was just wanting to clarify that this might work with orthos films, too. I believe I have all the chemiclas for the formulas he gave so I can give it a try.

    Thanks.

    -Mike

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