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  1. #21
    Curt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I don't know what the Scala Drop Process is, but Bob is saying to make the interpositive so that it contains all the detail and texture one might wish to print. (Whatever the Scala Drop Process it, it is not the only way to do this.) Then, when making the negative, one can decide which detail to include or exclude, by way of exposure and processing.

    It also sounds like Bob now uses an exposure unit or enlarger head that uses separate R/G/B lights to make white light.
    OK, that makes more sense.
    Thanks,
    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  2. #22
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Scala film is basically a negative that is turned into a positive. With that in mind any black and white negative film will work. Drop process is basically telling the operator to cut the development time to retain highlight detail ,

    For the first contact pos step you need a flat original to enlarge onto large film.
    Problem with the Scala method, I do not know anyone still doing it.

    But I am sure the folks at DR5 sure could tell you how to make a pos from a contact neg.

    Re the red green blue laser, sorry I cannot say as this type of discussion is not allowed here. ** hint ** film goes through laser imaging devices, rgb beams of energy do expose film, film taken from the imaging device and processed in a tray. ** but enough about that the mod/Police will be banning me soon.

    I only have grade 10 science so your bachelor of science trumps me by a long shot.
    Quote Originally Posted by Curt View Post
    Bob, What, what, what, I'm at a brain cell loss this evening, first what is the Scala Drop process, and second can you explain the Rollie ISO 25 in HC110 to tasted , red green blue laser exposure for someone with only a Bachelor of Science degree?

    Thanks very much,
    Curt

  3. #23
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Yes this is correct
    Yes this is not the only way of making a pos
    Yes dodge and burn to taste on the enlarger

    and yes I am making enlarged negs a different way now.
    using both inkjet and lambda onto real film.

    am I still allowed to stay here
    Quote Originally Posted by 2F/2F View Post
    I don't know what the Scala Drop Process is, but Bob is saying to make the interpositive so that it contains all the detail and texture one might wish to print. (Whatever the Scala Drop Process it, it is not the only way to do this.) Then, when making the negative, one can decide which detail to include or exclude, by way of exposure and processing.

    It also sounds like Bob now uses an exposure unit or enlarger head that uses separate R/G/B lights to make white light.

  4. #24

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    On page one Peter Schrager suggested x-ray dup film. I second that. I have used that for making enlarged negatives for pt/pd printing and can say that it is excellent. The chemistry is simple Kodak GBX, it is a reversal film so you can enlarge as making a print. Remember to reverse the negative that you are enlarging (emulsion up in the negative carrier) and every thing is reversed so if you burn, the new negative will be "lighter" in that area and the resulting print made from the new negative will be "darker". Dodging will yield a "darker" new negative and a "lighter" area in the resulting print. The film is very slow so when enlarging the exposures will be rather long. The tonal range is great.

    You will probably have to get it through a dental/medical supply or have your dentist order for you. It is not cheap but the results are worth it.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  5. #25
    ic-racer's Avatar
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  6. #26
    Robert Brummitt's Avatar
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    Another way.

    I understand that Eugene Smith hated darkroom work. So much so that he make one perfect print with dodges and burns and cropped then made a copy neg of that print. The neg was large maybe 8x10.
    With these he would just contact print. Cutting his darkroom time short. I'll have to go back in my books and videos to see if this is true. Maybe PE could answer this?
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit"
    Aristotle

  7. #27
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    IDK if the story is true, but we used to make dupe negs from prints quite easily. We used to use old Super XX sheet film.

    Just be aware that there is some loss in this process due to the limitations of reflection print materials.

    PE

  8. #28
    Robert Brummitt's Avatar
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    Found it!
    Eugene Smith made copy negatives of some of his most important images and made his later prints from these copy negatives. The results are a slight loss of printing scale (more contrast and less gradations) and detail, but if you didn’t have the prints side by side you would have a very difficult time telling one from the other.

    Why did Smith do it? Apparently with "Walk to Paradise" he had simply lost the negative. When CBS Sunday Morning worked on a Smith special, they asked if they could borrow the negative to make some prints. Smith had to break the news that he did not have it. CBS asked if they could borrow his vintage print to make a copy negative. When Smith saw the results, he asked CBS for the negative, with which he then produced virtually all the prints of Walk to Paradise currently in the market. Obviously, the vintage (and we will discuss that factor later) print exhibits qualities that the later prints do not and is much more highly valued.

    Smith went on to make his own copy negatives, which he used on particularly troublesome prints, like his famous Minamata image. Prints made from the original negative are about 40-50% higher than prints made from the copy negative.

    Source was http://www.iphotocentral.com/collect...ew.php/11/11/1
    "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit"
    Aristotle

  9. #29
    DarkroomDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Schrager View Post
    xray dupe film comes in all sizes...try it you'll lkie it!!
    Best, Peter
    Peter,

    I have a 100 sheet box of x-ray dup film but have had inconsistent results with it. I have had some success with D-72 and also with a developer I got from my dentist. The stuff from my dentist came with a bottle of fixer. The bottles were just marked "Developer" and "Fixer" and the wholesalers name and contact info. They were also marked to be used full strength. The developer had a very short life once the bottle was opened.

    What developer do you use? Where do you get it?

    Dan
    Daniel Williams
    Enumclaw WA USA

  10. #30
    Curt's Avatar
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    It seems like the best way to get a large negative is to either have it made by a lab or shoot a larger original. Of course if you are young and full of energy then experiment away. It looks like most of the suggestions lead to tinkering and figuring it out.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

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