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  1. #11
    David William White's Avatar
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    That may depend on the illumination in the scene as well as the final look. I preflash in batches after I cut my paper to size but still need to use a lens filter if I'm shooting outdoors in clear sunny light.

    Also worth mentioning if things get rough is bleaching before developing the paper negative, i.e. bleaching the latent image. I've only done it to see if it works, but it's not something I can do consistently.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  2. #12
    David William White's Avatar
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    POP paper, slower emulsions,less aggressive developers, etc. etc.

    Preflashing does reduce the contrast as well as increases the effective speed of the paper.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fragomeni View Post
    Measures like these and others that people take to combat the challenges of paper negs escape me sometimes. Paper negatives have been used successfully since the beginning of photography and it was never as complicated as people make it out to be (myself included). I've never found pre-flashing to be useful or serve any real purpose. Paper is orthochromatic, treat it as such and use the methods devised 150 years ago to efficiently capture an image on this type of material and it should work in the same ways it always has.
    Considerably AWOL at the present time...

    Archive/Blog: http://davidwilliamwhite.blogspot.com

  3. #13
    Fragomeni's Avatar
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    That may depend on the illumination in the scene as well as the final look.
    I'm talking about simply printing for reversal here, excluding if you do anything extra to the image after the latent image has been recorded that would cause tones to diverge in some way or another. A stop is a stop is a stop. Thats why a step tablet serves a purpose. If you could take say steps 12 and 15 on a 31-step tablet and print it in such as way that step 12 somehow reads as step 11 and step 15 somehow reads as step 19 (obviously without interfering in the exposure in some way), well then you'd be in a pickle and the step tablet would all of a sudden no longer be a constant from which we can gauge exposure. Stops are described logarithmically and we do this to accurately represent differences. There is no compressing or expanding defined differences in tone otherwise they could not be represented logarithmically.
    Francesco Fragomeni
    www.FrancescoFragomeni.com

  4. #14
    Fragomeni's Avatar
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    POP paper, slower emulsions,less aggressive developers, etc. etc.

    Preflashing does reduce the contrast as well as increases the effective speed of the paper.
    Yea I acknowledge these things to have their own effects but overall I haven't found many to be of use (but thats just me, I am no litmus test!)
    Francesco Fragomeni
    www.FrancescoFragomeni.com

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