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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    Don't quote me on this, but I believe I have heard that VC emulsions are made from mixing two emulsions together that are laid down at the same time -- not two distinct layers. It would certainly simplify and speed up the manufacturing process! But I could easily be wrong about this.

    I thought the whole idea behind a vacuum easel was to do away from the need to use glass, and the two additional surfaces that dust can be on?
    The vacuum easel works great for keeping large sheets of paper flat, but anything above that paper it has no bearing on. If I were to put a sheet of paper on the easel and turn the pump on the paper goes flat, then I position the 8x10 neg over the paper and there's nothing to force the neg to make close contact with the paper. That's why I'll need a heavy sheet of 11x14 plate glass. The suction from the easel on the overlapping glass will also help put pressure on the neg/paper. I read somewhere where a person used a very large sheet of mylar on a vacuum easel and they said it worked fine.

  2. #12
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    The other way I have heard vacuum easels used is to tape the negative all the way round to a hole in a piece of mylar or similar material (larger than the photo paper). Lay that on the paper on the easel and the vacuum will suck the neg to the paper.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    The other way I have heard vacuum easels used is to tape the negative all the way round to a hole in a piece of mylar or similar material (larger than the photo paper). Lay that on the paper on the easel and the vacuum will suck the neg to the paper.
    I think I'm going to try the 11x14 or bigger sheet of 1/2 inch plate glass as I think the weight of that should keep the neg in very close contact with the paper. Plus, I can always use it for proofing over the thin piece of glass I have now.

  4. #14
    Tony Egan's Avatar
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    I use a thin sheet of foam under the paper and glass so there is a little bit of "give" as the glass meets the negative to avoid lack of perfect contact due to less than flat base board.
    I had a glass shop make me a very thick and heavy 16x20" piece with smooth bevelled edges for not much money.
    http://www.tonyeganphotography.com/index.html
    "Those are my principles, and if you don't like them... well, I have others." Groucho Marx

  5. #15

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    Might you be best served by buying a contact printing frame

    http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/cart/home.php?cat=38

    So much better than a sheet of glass and will last for ever

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by aluncrockford View Post
    Might you be best served by buying a contact printing frame

    http://www.bostick-sullivan.com/cart/home.php?cat=38

    So much better than a sheet of glass and will last for ever
    Not when I already have a vacuum easel and no money to burn. I like the sounds of the 16x20 heavy(1/2") glass, for not much money, that Tony talks about. I can't see a contact printing frame from Bostick-Sullivan keeping it any flatter, but I could be wrong. If I had a little extra money I might go with the contact print frame or if I were to do a lot of contact printing. I have plans for neither, but that might change. So, for now it's the vacuum easel and heavy glass. John

  7. #17

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    I've settled on a Printfile Contact printer after having my fun with thick glass (registration and finger print issues) and a split back printing frame (mine was a pita to open and close).

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