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  1. #11
    DanielStone's Avatar
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    no worries Tim,

    they've both got their uses, and both are very helpful at keeping things flat

    -Dan

  2. #12
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    Something I've always wondered, how can a vacuum frame keep a paper flat and the negative flat? It seems that no suction would get to the negative, unless it was much bigger than the paper and had vacuum holes around the edges??

    Confused in Kansas,
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Something I've always wondered, how can a vacuum frame keep a paper flat and the negative flat? It seems that no suction would get to the negative, unless it was much bigger than the paper and had vacuum holes around the edges??

    Confused in Kansas,
    The frame sucks a rubber or vinyl membrane against glass, with the paper and negative between the two.

    I had similar questions until I dove in and built one myself from two large picture frames, a piece of glass, a sheet of vinyl a vacuum pump, a pack of weatherstripping, some rubber tubing and a stapler. I've subsequently added hinges. Fairly economical, works exceedingly well.

    -- Jorj

  4. #14
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    Thanks Jorj,

    This brings me to my next question... what is the advantage over a standard contact printing frame, since there's still glass in the path?
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe

  5. #15

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    Good question. I think it is perfectly even contact between paper and neg.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Something I've always wondered, how can a vacuum frame keep a paper flat and the negative flat? It seems that no suction would get to the negative, unless it was much bigger than the paper and had vacuum holes around the edges??

    Confused in Kansas,
    That's easy - holes in the paper!!!
    Steve

  7. #17
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    If you use a vacuum cleaner as a pump, make sure that the motor has its own cooling air (as do most or all shop vacuums) instead of blowing the air from the filter bag through or around the motor. In the latter case, operating for too long without airflow may overheat the motor. This would be particularly bad if the thing was in another room to isolate the noise (and, eventually, smell of burning insulation...)

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark View Post
    Good question. I think it is perfectly even contact between paper and neg.
    Right. For small prints it shouldn't make any difference one way or the other. I like to print ~17x22, and the vacuum frame gives me perfect contact between the negative and paper.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielStone View Post
    some of these "frames" look more akin to an easel(for keeping a piece of enlarging paper flat) rather than a vacuum FRAME(which sucks a negative and paper together).
    Dan,

    Vacuum FRAMEs are commonly used on process cameras to hold the original in firm contact with the back of the glass, ensuring its flatness.

    The film in this case is on the other side of the lens/shutter.

    - Leigh

  10. #20
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    Hello. I haven't used a vacuum frame or easel. But I have built my own pump for laminating composite stuff in a diy project (don't ask..) I used an compressor from an old refrigerator. It was rather silent and produced enough vacuum to laminate fiberglass. You can find them in scrap heaps for free or a modest sum. Just a small advice.

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