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  1. #21
    eagleowl's Avatar
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    I've just bought...

    ..."The master printer's workbook" by Steve Macleod.
    The text is informative without being excessive,there are plenty of photos to illustrate the techniques,all of which have the photographer's handwritten notes and sketches.
    A common mistake people made when designing something completely foolproof was to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

    Computers are incredibly stupid,but they are capable of being incredibly stupid many millions of times a second.

    Both said by Doug Adams

    Only put off until tomorrow that which you are prepared to die having not done-Pablo Picasso

  2. #22
    bjorke's Avatar
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    If you can find used ones, the Lustrum Press (R Gibson) Darkroom and Darkroom 2 from the 1970's are good references to photographers' thought processes. I know someone here on APUG sold a set in recent months.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Revy
    I recently bought Les Mclean's book, 'Creative Black and White Photography' and find it full of great information, and very clearly written.
    I will second that. It is a well written book with lot of good information. I have to admit, I was put off on the book for a long time because of the cover photo, which I really dislike. However, one day I found myself looking through the book for something about staining developers and found it really is a great book. Just goes to show, you can't judge a book by it's cover.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  4. #24
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    I will second that. It is a well written book with lot of good information. I have to admit, I was put off on the book for a long time because of the cover photo, which I really dislike.
    Snap! The front cover photo reminds me of an old Picture Post shot so I assumed the book was quite old, or at least old-fashioned in outlook. Wrong yet again... I would have bought it the 1st time I saw it if it had the back cover waterfall on the front cover! As it is, I got it a couple of weeks ago and even then only after reading Les' description of split-grade printing here. I agree, a very clearly written and useful book.


    Unfortunately Aristotelis, I can't recommend any other book as your library exactly duplicates mine except for the one book, Fotografia, and a few other books I have that I would not recommend above those you already have...

    Cheers, Bob.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by eagleowl
    ..."The master printer's workbook" by Steve Macleod.
    The text is informative without being excessive,there are plenty of photos to illustrate the techniques,all of which have the photographer's handwritten notes and sketches.
    I was about to suggest this one also. Rather than the often used technical approach, Steve gives some insight into his interpretation of images using different techniques, with a more visual approach. It's very effective. Personally I've gained quite a lot from this book over the last year or so. Take a look at the Rotovision website - they generally have very high quality productions.

    The others i would suggest have been mentioned. Mr Les McLean's, Tim Rudmans (Printing), and Bruce Barnbaum's (only 2nd edition available new) would be all you need in my opinion.

  6. #26
    arigram's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your suggestions!
    Please keep them coming! I am sure others are interested in it.
    There should be review posts in the books forum of the analog technique books.
    After all, they aren't -that- many.

    With all the suggestions for Les book, I am surprised he didn't write one himself.
    I am sure he is too modest for that.
    aristotelis grammatikakis
    www.arigram.gr
    Real photographs, created in camera, 100% organic,
    no digital additives and shit




  7. #27

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    The Larry Bartlett book is very enjoyable. The photographs are mostly in the classic reportage style. It clearly shows how L. Bartlett took the straight print to a finished print; many of which are quite stunning.

    The Steve MacLeod book is also nice, but somehow left me a bit cold.

    Eddie Ephraum's "Creative Elements" is full of impressive landscape pictures and loads of formulas (to make toners, developers etc from raw chemicals), but I can't help feeling that he overworks his prints with his endless bleaching and toning stuff; but the final prints are fantastic indeed.

    But, Aristotelis, there are two books that I would definitely recommend: "Darkroom" and "Darkroom2" by Lustrum Press. They are rather difficult to find because they were pulished in 1977 and 78, respectively. Also, the print quality of the photographs is rather poor by todays standards. However, whereas most other books are monographic in that they show one persons methods, these darkroom books are a collection of the working practices of 23 photographers; and it's astonishing to find out how literally each of them does everything in their own unique way.
    For example, Eikoh Hosoe says: "I prefer to use high contrast paper and a rather thin negative...", whereas Ralph Gibson says: "I overexpose, and overdevelop and, in the process, pick up grain and contrast. This yields a dense negative, but through the years I have found that I prefer them this way".

  8. #28

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    I have seen or own all the books previously mentioned. I believe that the following book is far and away the best book to learn and refine your printing.

    The Elements of Black and White Printing, Going Beyond Darkroom Basics by Carson Graves (2nd edt, Focal Press).


    This book covers basics of chemistry of paper developers, how to test and evaluate papers and chemistry, efficient printing techniques, archival processing and more. This book specifically covers learning to print as well as slavage techniques for problem negatives, as well as sections on toning, bleaching, evaluating prints etc.

    If I was going to teach a class on printing, this would be the book I would use for a text.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  9. #29
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    I have darkroom 2 , I didn't think to mention this book as it is quite old and I have not seen it on the bookshelves for years. so if you want more here are a few that I found to have usefull info
    The compact photo lab index - M&M
    the focal encyclopedia of photography
    copying and duplicating - kodak m-1
    The care of photographs- siegrried rempel
    the darkroom handbook - dennis curtin and joe demaio

    Any book Phil Davis produced in the early 70"s , his book was our first year guide book.


    A suggestion is to go to any college or university that has a photographic book section or thesis. I know Ryerson here in Toronto has an archive of technical /artistic notes that would choke a horse.

  10. #30

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    Way Beyond Monochrome is an excellent book with very little digital content. Also Tim Rudman's Master Printing book is a great asset with a real and practical approach.

    Another book that fills a lot of gaps is Roger Hicks and Frances Schultz "Perfect Exposure" which I highly recommend. Roger has a wonderfully simple and clear approach to a variety of common questions.

    Ctein's Post Exposure is also another on my list of must haves.

    Kind Regards,
    Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the ark. Professionals built the Titanic.

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