Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,882   Posts: 1,520,515   Online: 828
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32
  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,592
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    If that's the case, it's rarely used correctly.
    The same critique can be made of the zone system. And of photography in general.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12
    whlogan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Hendersonville, NC
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    497
    Images
    92
    iI am puzzled why we are taking up space here on HDR and the Zone System, one a Digital method and one a valid film method. HDR is not known, so far as I know to be of much use in film photography and one is. Those of us who know and use the Zone System and use it often, even some times when we don't even know we are, and hardly even never think of HDR. But photographic techniques of all sorts can often be of use to us when we are wandering in the wilderness sometimes and alone out there and afraid for things that are not working for us. We all need help from time to time and while I doubt that HDR might help out in a pinch; one never knows and never say never and use what you gotta my Dad said and its helped a time or two in some weird situations. I shall wait for HDR to save me in film photography, some fine day. But its efficacy is off, way off guys.
    Logan

  3. #13
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Francisco area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,836
    Images
    1
    I've used HDR with film but admittedly in a hybrid way. Shoot two or more frames of film on a tripod at 1-3 stops apart then scan all three in, combine them and "paint" layers in at certain areas to add detail to shadows or highlights. In many ways same as burning/dodging or masking in the darkroom. I will say I do it much more subtlety than that overdone color HDR crap so often seen.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    I don't mix photography and computers. And photos shot with digital cameras bore me. There's no intrinsic value in it; no investment. For the better or worse of it, a film picture requires an investment in the raw materials, and a risk that it might not turn out perfectly as conceived. But in the end, it is what it is. The digital photographer could simply delete it from the screen on the back of the camera and shoot another, because there is no monetary value in it; nothing to risk or lose. Fishing in a barrel or shooting deer from a stand overlooking a corn pile is not hunting.

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,050
    Images
    60
    Anyone who has shot two negatives - one exposed for the foreground and the other exposed for the sky - and then printed them sequentially on the same paper has used a film based form of HDR.

    I have seen two types of digital HDR that I appreciated:

    1) HDR used so subtly that I wouldn't have known it was used without being told; and
    2) HDR used to bring together two parts of the scene that could not normally be practically shown in the same photo.

    An example of the latter was a series of shots taken by an architect/photographer to illustrate both the interior and exterior of some of his glass walled designs for resort properties. The result was unworldly, but in an interesting way.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    SE Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,508
    Images
    15
    There is a proliferation of HDR photography / "art" any which way you look on the web. It's unfortunate I think that a B&W magazine should be seeking entries where artifice takes precedence of a solid grasp of foundation skills in photography as they apply to B&W, or all photography for that matter. I agree with The Flying Camera there is a body of stirling work there which does credit to photographers who know what they are doing; in balance, that might be the contest's saving grace. Foundation skills in photography are being eroded by the push to get more and more done by computer, instead of organising and visualising the scene with the camera. Personally I skip over obvious HDR work, including layering, composites, obvious artificial effect and the like. I enjoy looking at what people achieve in the darkroom and rarely, if at all, pay lip-service to what happens with digital images. By admission, I do not tweak any of my digital images. The lab involved in hybridized printing also does not make any changes. I don't think a multi-exposure in-camera, on film, is considered "HDR", but Matt King is correct in that printing two negatives sequentially equates to HDR
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 08-20-2013 at 04:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  7. #17
    darkosaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,506
    When I see HDR - 99,999% pictures are telling me: "look at my technique, look at this HDR", they are not sending any other message to me.
    Opposite example are ParkeHarrison couple - they are sending clear message - I don't look at they work and say: it is illustration or photoshop - I see clear message and vision from the artists.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire, England
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    720
    Or as one long deceased photographer once said, "Expose for the shadows, and let the highlights take care of themselves".

    He was right and it still stands up today. Get the detail on the negative from the shadow area and you can always burn in the highlights. No need for 2 separate negatives and the accompanying risk of miss alignment.

    As I sometimes do, expose at half the film sped and 'pull' the development to reduce contrast.

  9. #19
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Ignacio, CO, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,592
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Burning, to bring detail in from the negative outside of the paper's straight print range, is an HDR technique, as is dodging to do the same.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  10. #20
    vpwphoto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,107
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    7
    My original understanding of HDR was to expand exposure latitude (Zone System).
    The OP's observation of the pencil sketch gritty look is called "HDR", but not what I consider the original intent.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin