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  1. #1
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    A Windisch surprise

    Yesterday at a Camera fair I picked up a copy of Hans Windisch's famous book, an English copy of "DIE NEUE PHOTO.SCHULE, Die Technik"

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	75269 This is the cover of my 1944 German language version, I have a 1938 English language copy as well, What made yesterdays purchase interesting was it was a 1956 version and refered to Ilford Phenidone developers and also pointed out that Kodak had copied one of Windisch's developers for D25.

    So my latest Windisch book is called "The Manual of Modern Photography - Technique" and it's well written.

    Ian

  2. #2
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Ian,
    In my reading on D23 diluted 1+3 (which I have been using with 4x5 lately) I came across a few people stating that D23 at that dilution is similar to a Windisch developer. I wonder if you know which one and what the actual formula is?
    Thanks!
    Shawn

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Shawn, Windisch claims that D25 is derived from his W665 formula but without the Ortho-phenylene diamine.

    W665

    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 90g
    Ortho-phenylene diamine 12g
    Metol 12g
    Sodium metabisulphite 10g
    Water to 1 litre


    Windisch's own developer similar to D25 is:

    W22

    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 65g 93g
    Metol 8g 11.4g
    Sodium Metabisulphite 7g 10g
    Water to 700ml 1 litre

    Windisch published W22 to make 700ml of developer, I've added the figures to make 1 litre.


    This one is also listed:

    Metol Sulphite developer


    Sodium Sulphite (anhyd) 50g
    Metol 2.5g
    Water to 1 litre

    It pre-dates the Kodak D23 formula. It's in both my earlier copies of "DIE NEUE PHOTO.SCHULE, Die Technik"

    Ian

  4. #4
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Thank you, Ian. That 3rd one is pretty close to diluted D23. Somewhere between 1+2 and 1+3, though a bit heavy on the Sodium Sulphite. Interesting that it is in your 1938 copy as well. Thanks again for posting these.

  5. #5
    MDR
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    Ian I don't know when D23 was introduced but after WWII most German Patents were voided as War reparation and many US companies benefited quiet a lot from these reparations as did the US economy.

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    D23 & D25 were introduced in a Kodak Research document by Henn & Crabtree in 1944.

    Ian

  7. #7
    MDR
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    Thank you. Again in Wartime the enemies copyright didn't really count. And as you very well know Kodak wasn't as big an innovator as we are led to believe. Like any Big company they mostly bought innovation (T-grain etc... are an exception to the rule).

  8. #8
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    Thank you. Again in Wartime the enemies copyright didn't really count. And as you very well know Kodak wasn't as big an innovator as we are led to believe. Like any Big company they mostly bought innovation (T-grain etc... are an exception to the rule).
    Kodak lagged way behind in terms of their B&W developers and films, they only caught up and went past their competitors in the 1980's. D76 and some other well known Kodak developers evolved from the Wellington & Ward buffered borax developer.

    Ian

  9. #9
    MDR
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    Yet we are led to believe that Kodak was the great innovator without whom modern film photography would not exist

  10. #10
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    ...but after WWII most German Patents were voided as War reparation and many US companies benefited quiet a lot from these reparations as did the US economy.
    Even patents of so-called allies were voided.

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