Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 73,998   Posts: 1,633,406   Online: 1002
      
Page 17 of 21 FirstFirst ... 71112131415161718192021 LastLast
Results 161 to 170 of 210
  1. #161

    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Mississauga, Canada
    Shooter
    Plastic Cameras
    Posts
    23
    Publisher don't like to include irrelevant information regarding photography in books and lives because public like to read only photographers experiences. They love to read imaginary story and pictures. They don't like to read which camera photographer's used to captured great pictures and why they love to used that camera as well as what's features of camera. How they captured pictures? So that's why no one like to include additional information of camera and their techniques.
    Portraits By Mina Oakville Photographers is famous portrait Professional Studio that offer all type of portrait photography with best customer services like business portraits, family portraits and executive portraits.

  2. #162

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    8,093
    Images
    228
    Quote Originally Posted by ScarletBrown View Post
    Publisher don't like to include irrelevant information regarding photography in books and lives because public like to read only photographers experiences. They love to read imaginary story and pictures. They don't like to read which camera photographer's used to captured great pictures and why they love to used that camera as well as what's features of camera. How they captured pictures? So that's why no one like to include additional information of camera and their techniques.
    I doubt this is true because I always want to know that stuff but then again I'm not normal lol

  3. #163
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,928
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I doubt this is true because I always want to know that stuff but then again I'm not normal lol
    We know you're not normal Stone.

    I doubt it's true also, but I think the reason has to do with the intent/focus of the book. Is the book about "the content/the pretty pictures" or is it a "how to".

    Not saying it can't do both, it just normally isn't.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #164
    horacekenneth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    MD
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    372
    I just was introduced to this photographer in another thread: http://www.craigvarjabedian.com/

    One of the links on his main page is called Processes & Tools. Seems like what you are looking for. I think it is interesting to see what materials and equipment photographers choose.

  5. #165
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,065
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by horacekenneth View Post
    I just was introduced to this photographer in another thread: http://www.craigvarjabedian.com/

    One of the links on his main page is called Processes & Tools. Seems like what you are looking for. I think it is interesting to see what materials and equipment photographers choose.
    I would be more interested in why heor she took the picture and what the photographer is trying to communicate with it. equipment is secondary at best.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #166
    markbarendt's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Beaverton, OR, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,928
    Blog Entries
    3
    Images
    19
    Yep

  7. #167

    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    920
    I just flipped to the back of John Sexton's Recollections (which is getting very dusty) and re-glanced over the tech pages. With all due respect to this revered photographer, even for his own students, is there anything more arbitrary than f stops? I've seen interviews with him, he's a very thoughtful guy, and I'm sure the addition of that information is nothing more than a genre convention. I've only ever observed it with traditional landscape photographers, who are usually engaged in 'workshop culture', where it might be encouraged to jot this information on the back of every print. It's quite a finicky habit then.

    This Craig Varjabedian guy linked (whose images are very nice incidentally) clearly comes from the same school as Sexton. I think it comes down to the old 'taking/making' anxiety of this classic landscape genre - as if focal length, speed, aperture, developer etc. are somehow 'evidence' which can be supplied in the event of being challenged!
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  8. #168
    kintatsu's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Bavaria, Germany
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    368
    Images
    2
    It's my thought, that other than mentioned above, it limits one to use the information. By trying to copy what tools and techniques a photographer used you limit yourself to the status of a mimic.

    By knowing why and the photographers thoughts, a better impression can be gained. You also have some understanding of how to approach a similar subject or situation, whether to make it different or express a similar attitude.

    That's the beautiful part of Ansel Adams "Examples," the stories and recollections. His impression and thoughts at the time clarify the image. By knowing the values and where they were placed, you can calculate the rest of the expossure. He usually tells his development, N, -, or +, so without giving you his development time, he tells the experienced photographer what to do with scenes like that if they wish to make something similar in expression or values.

    He does the same in his Basic Photography series, which makes it a more useful tool than saying "I shot this at f/8, 1/60 and that's how you do it!" Remember, in photography, there is no true right and wrong. Right is what works for you.

  9. #169

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,479
    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    I just flipped to the back of John Sexton's Recollections (which is getting very dusty) and re-glanced over the tech pages. With all due respect to this revered photographer, even for his own students, is there anything more arbitrary than f stops? I've seen interviews with him, he's a very thoughtful guy, and I'm sure the addition of that information is nothing more than a genre convention. I've only ever observed it with traditional landscape photographers, who are usually engaged in 'workshop culture', where it might be encouraged to jot this information on the back of every print. It's quite a finicky habit then.

    This Craig Varjabedian guy linked (whose images are very nice incidentally) clearly comes from the same school as Sexton. I think it comes down to the old 'taking/making' anxiety of this classic landscape genre - as if focal length, speed, aperture, developer etc. are somehow 'evidence' which can be supplied in the event of being challenged!
    f-stops are not arbitrary at all, and to someone learning the craft this information can be of value, or at the very least, of interest.

  10. #170

    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    911
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Bingo! He gets it!
    There's no "getting it". The book in itself is the whole idea about why she took the pictures and blaba.

    A few extra pages with shooting infos would be super welcome. I personally spend a lot of time determining which developer to use and why. As a photo amateur, I would LOVE to know what other photographers use in their books.

    I'm astounded that some apug members don't give more importance to this. Is this APUG or what?



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin