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  1. #11

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    Thanks for posting, Bill. I have long wished I could find a copy of the story about the mid-air collision of the XB-70 bomber in June 1966. It touched me deeply, as I had spent five years as a lead engineer in the design of the portion of the airplane that included the cockpit and ejection system, before moving from L.A. to Seattle. I was stunned when I first saw the headline on the day following the crash, while I was at my first (of several) AA workshops in Yosemite. It was an incredible story that Life published later of the detailed sequence of events of the collision, including the struggles of the pilot to successfully eject and the co-pilot who was not so fortunate. The system was designed to allow ejecting at 70,000 ft altitude at Mach 3!, maintaining the "shirt-sleeve" environment of the cockpit sealed into the capsule (while the outside surface of the plane was at 450F/232C).

    For anyone interested, p.126:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=D1M...q=xb-70&f=true

    BTW, it's helpful to use the two-pg spread display mode and the magnifier to read through the article, while ignoring ads.
    Last edited by silveror0; 06-15-2014 at 03:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I didn't expect APUG'ers to have been published in LIFE but I guess I shouldn't be surprised!

    What got me going is that Henri Cartier-Bresson was shooting COLOR! I had a totally different impression and now I can't even imagine how he did it? Was it like me, one body and just switch "gears" day by day. Or did he have two bodies... Did he take same shots both color and black and white? The questions go on and on...

  3. #13
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silveror0 View Post
    Thanks for posting, Bill. I have long wished I could find a copy of the story about the mid-air collision of the XB-70 bomber in June 1966. It touched me deeply, as I had spent five years as a lead engineer in the design of the portion of the airplane that included the cockpit and ejection system, before moving from L.A. to Seattle. I was stunned when I first saw the headline on the day following the crash, while I was at my first (of several) AA workshops in Yosemite. It was an incredible story that Life published later of the detailed sequence of events of the collision, including the struggles of the pilot to successfully eject and the co-pilot who was not so fortunate. The system was designed to allow ejecting at 70,000 ft altitude at Mach 3!, maintaining the "shirt-sleeve" environment of the cockpit sealed into the capsule (while the outside surface of the plane was at 450F/232C).

    For anyone interested, p.126:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=D1M...q=xb-70&f=true

    BTW, it's helpful to use the two-pg spread display mode and the magnifier to read through the article, while ignoring ads.
    Wow. What a gripping story that was. Even all these decades later.

    It's been said that engineering is the art of risk mitigation. Not augmentation. Not elimination. Because there are an infinite number of ways things can go wrong, but only one or at best a handful of ways they can go right, when things fail they often do so in ways and sequences and combinations never anticipated. That's why systems are designed to be robust. To handle the unknowns. Or to try to.

    That high-altitude high-speed ejection system failed for one pilot. But it worked for the other. It didn't work perfectly in either instance. But it worked well enough in one instance that a life was saved. And that's a successful mitigation. Just ask those Apollo 13 guys 46 months later.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    Just ask those Apollo 13 guys 46 months later.
    Speaking of Apollo 13, I saw the movie of that experience and was so impressed with the thoroughness of the simulation of every detail that I HAD to see it again. It so very well portrayed that era and resurrected many memories of what I lived through.

  5. #15
    Curt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    When I started High School, I read every LIFE Magazine I could get my hands on, the school library had a full set and let me wander the stacks...

    I'm sure those days shaped my photographic eye, though I can't really prove it directly...

    I feel like a kid again, here they are ready to leaf through...

    For example LIFE Feb 13, 1950 contains the article where one of my favorite HCB photographs was published...

    http://books.google.com/books?id=FlM...page&q&f=false
    My grandparents subscribed to life and Look magazines in the fifties. I spent hours and hours with each issue. They were major publications at the time. The black and white photographs planted the seed for sure.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  6. #16
    Trask's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Burk View Post
    What got me going is that Henri Cartier-Bresson was shooting COLOR! I had a totally different impression and now I can't even imagine how he did it? Was it like me, one body and just switch "gears" day by day. Or did he have two bodies... Did he take same shots both color and black and white? The questions go on and on...
    At the HCB show I attended a couple of weeks ago I read that he felt that he had to be responsive to requests from clients like LIFE for color shots but that he considered them "documentary" in nature, not like the photographs he made in B/W that (in his view) relied on proper framing, tone, timing, etc. to create a more interpretive image.

  7. #17
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Wow! Thanks, I had no idea these resources were available. A friend just sent me two (actual) sheets from a LIFE Magazine that delved into pinhole photography -- in August 1943! The lead-in has a photo of an Army O-52 observation plane with "TAKEN WITH ROLLEIFLEX CAMERA" superimposed on it. The caption under the photo includes "photographer set shutter of his camera for 1/50 of a second, stopped down to F16." Ya don't see that in too many magazines these days! Apparently it was part of an ongoing series of photography themed stuff LIFE ran back then.

    The article goes on to show a pinhole camera built and tried using non-conventional chemistry for processing.

    (I was around then, but at age two wasn't paying much attention!)

    I was considering scanning the article to share, but lo and behold, the Gargoyle folks have done it for me.

  8. #18
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    I like all those ads in that magazine...
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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