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  1. #61

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    Paul Petzold's Light on People

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner
    Mentioned once before in this thread, Weston's "Daybooks" while not really a "photo" book in the classic sense, are an incredible gift from one of the greatest photographers in history.
    Another I would recommend like that would be, Ansel Adams: Autobiography.
    I would also recommend William Eggleston's "2 1/4."
    Can't forget Eugene Richards, "Dorchester Days".
    Others I like a lot, Susan Meiselass "Nicaragua", and Donna Ferrato's "Living With The Enemy''

    Brian
    My "Personal" Photography Website...

    "Photography is an act of Life" - Maine 2006

  3. #63

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    There are two books in my collection that I haven't seen listed here, and I wanted to mention them because both changed my seeing of landscapes and florals respectively.

    "Orchestrating Icons", Huntington Witherill

    "Flora", Imogen Cunningham

    John Clark
    www.johndclark.com

  4. #64
    Wigwam Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bjorke
    The one must-have possesion is... a library card.
    Not where I live. The pictures are all colored in already.
    Best,

    Wiggy

    Note to Self: Tse-Tse Fly - No Antidote

  5. #65
    Wigwam Jones's Avatar
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    I read this thread with some trepidation - for a couple of reasons. However, I was pleased to see a number of people mention Meatyard. This is one photographer who resonates with me, even if I have no desire to emulate his style.

    However, I remain somewhat perplexed.

    First, the subject line. With respect to the author of this thread; should there be a set of standard photography books that one should have on their shelves? Does this imply that the books are for decoration, or to give a certain impression? "Well, if one doesn't have [insert name here] on their shelves, is no true devotee."

    This leads to my second question - why books? I could not understand what many photographs were saying until I saw them hung in galleries and museums. Books didn't seem to convey the sense of their meaning to me, and I often wondered what the rest of the world saw in them; I could extract little or no meaning from them, even larger coffee-table-sized books.

    I have very few books of photography on my shelves. Meatyard and a few Phaidon 55 chapbooks, some on the history of photography. If I have them, it is generally because I lack the time or means to get to a place where that photographer's works can be seen in public and I want to learn what little I can about them. Often because the photographer in question was neglected by the public and the art world or relegated to obscurity. Most of the Avant-Garde Czech photographers intrigue me, and I have no other way of seeing their work anywhere near me. Still, a poor second choice overall.

    On the other hand, I have many books, old magazines, and periodicals and annuals on photographic processes and methods and procedures - even camera collecting. These instruct and inform me.

    Books on photography interest me. Books of photography seldom do.
    Best,

    Wiggy

    Note to Self: Tse-Tse Fly - No Antidote

  6. #66

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wigwam Jones
    Books on photography interest me. Books of photography seldom do.
    You have a very good point!
    My first thoughts to this thread were similiar books, like "The Photography Reader" by Liz Wells, and "One Being A Photographer" by David Hurn and Bill Jay.
    Another, I LOVED, that isn't so much a photography book, but rather a "creative living" one is, "Art & Fear: Observations (And Rewards) On Artmaking" By David Bayles and Ted Orland.

    Someone did mention Susan Sontag's "On Photography", amongst others.

    Brian
    Last edited by mtbbrian; 07-26-2006 at 04:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    My "Personal" Photography Website...

    "Photography is an act of Life" - Maine 2006

  7. #67
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davec101
    Am not disputing that Paul Taylor's photogravures at Renaissance Press are good if not excellent, but saying they are 'much better' than Izu's prints is a bit strong and rather sweeping as I consider Izu's prints to be up there with the very best prints in the world.
    Strong, yes. Sweeping? Maybe. However, I've seen dozens of Izu's platinum prints at his show a few years back at the Sackler Gallery and was not particularly impressed with either his vision or his printing. But those photogravures jump right off the wall at you. They're so good that I'm willing to overlook the sloppy composition and the vignetted corners.

  8. #68
    Wigwam Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbrian
    Someone did mention Susan Sontag's "On Photography", amongst others.
    Then I would have to add "Camera Lucida" by Roland Barthes. Hard slogging to get through this small book, but well worth it. Sontag didn't do it for me, but then again, I was young when I read it. Perhaps a revisit is in order. I dunno - the concept of photography's true purpose being as a tool of social justice makes me puke. Not that it shouldn't be done or that it isn't useful in that way - but that I have zero interest in expressing a political viewpoint or attempting to create social change via photography.
    Best,

    Wiggy

    Note to Self: Tse-Tse Fly - No Antidote

  9. #69
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wigwam Jones
    the concept of photography's true purpose being as a tool of social justice makes me puke. Not that it shouldn't be done or that it isn't useful in that way - but that I have zero interest in expressing a political viewpoint or attempting to create social change via photography.

    I agree and I have the same opinion on music. I have no interest at all in songs which are trying to prove a point or protest about something (usually political).

    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  10. #70

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    "...why books?"

    I love books--they are important to me. Of the books I love, photography and art books are my greatest loves. They are the only real means I have of seeing the art that interests me. I don't live in an area that has a lot of museums and art galleries and I'm not a big fan of visiting those large metropolitan areas that are the cultural centers. I despise looking at photographs on computer screens and have no interest in photography galleries on the internet. Public libraries are okay but they don't compare to a personal library.

    Personally, I have no interest in books on cameras, procedures, techniques, etc., with very few exceptions. I can get all that information with a little research on websites such as APUG. Books of photographs by photographers I admire are relatively cheap compared to actual photographs and books are pretty relatively available. Some of my favorite photographers produced their pictures mainly for the purpose of publishing them in books. Robert Frank, Paul Strand and Ralph Gibson all come to mind.

    I've been buying photographer's monographs and books of photography since I first got interested in the subject almost 35 years ago. It was a natural thing to do since I was a book-nut before becoming a photo-nut. Going through some of those older books is like rediscovering forgotten treasures. Also, I was lucky enough to gain my interest in photography at a time when there were lots of photographs printed in photography-based publications simply because they were good photographs, not because they were there to illustrate and article on a new product. So, books OF photographs are my interest.



 

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