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  1. #1

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    Rangefinder landscape books?

    I would like to know if anyone has come across any great color landscape books, where RF equipment is used. Hopefully with a lot of example images.

    I really like the John Shaw book, and would like to find something like this, done with RF type gear. Thanks for any suggestions.

  2. #2
    roteague's Avatar
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    There are lots of landscape books available, but I don't know any that are specific to RF. I really doubt there is enough interest in using an RF for landscape work to make a book on it viable. However, check with naturephoto1, I know he uses a Leica at times.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #3

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    Most of David Muench's photographs are taken with a rangefinder camera (Linhof Technika).

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by roteague
    There are lots of landscape books available, but I don't know any that are specific to RF. I really doubt there is enough interest in using an RF for landscape work to make a book on it viable. However, check with naturephoto1, I know he uses a Leica at times.
    Robert,

    My Leicas are the R (SLR) cameras since I normally need the extreme range of very short to very long lenses as well as lenses for macro work.

    However, I do have a Mamiya 7II, but I have not used it enough at this point to make comments. I purchased this system to take when I wanted something with a larger negative/transparency than my Leicas, did not require close-up work, or did not need the movements and the negative/transparency size and weight and bulk of my linhof Technikardan 45S.

    Many photographers have used the Mamiya 7/7II for backpacking landscape and other types of travel photography.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  5. #5
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naturephoto1
    Robert,

    My Leicas are the R (SLR) cameras since I normally need the extreme range of very short to very long lenses as well as lenses for macro work.
    Just goes to show you how much I know about Leicas.

    Mamiya 7II is on my wish list.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #6
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Mitchell
    Most of David Muench's photographs are taken with a rangefinder camera (Linhof Technika).
    Yes, but I suspect he uses the ground glass like the rest of us. Those RF are useless with the movement he tends to use.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  7. #7

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    Thanks

    Very good info. I'm specifically interested in 35mm rf used for landscape work. Kind of trying to find the best that is out there given the limitations.

    I've checked out many of your galleries, and am quite impressed!

  8. #8
    roteague's Avatar
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    No worries. If you go to my website, you can see my book recommendations for landscape photography: http://www.visionlandscapes.com/Reso...Resource=Books
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  9. #9
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    I doubt many books identify that rangefinder cameras were used because, generally, you can't tell that a rangefinder was used. There is a theoretical optical advantage to rangefinders when using ultrawide lenses because the lens designs can be much simpler (an inverted telephoto design is required in SLRs to work around the mirror box).

    I have several RF cameras and although I don't use them nearly as much as my SLRs (they are low-end Soviet cameras that i use more for fun than for anything serious), I know enough to know that there is no reason that you can't use RF cameras for landscape work. You lose the ability to use zoom lenses (although if you shoot Leica, there is a Tri-Elmar that has three fixed focal lengths in one lens), and you lose the ability to visually inspect your depth of field, but those can be worked around.

    In general I prefer 35mm for landscape work, but if you like to shoot infrared, rangefinder bodies can be excellent. You can use a very dark, even visually opaque, filter without interfering with your view of the scene.

  10. #10

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    Photojim has it. Very few 'pretty picture' books are going to tell you what sort of equipment was used: the only place you are likely to find more about what was used to shoot which pictures is in 'how to' books. I have written quite a lot of the latter -- check 'books' on www.rogerandfrances.com -- and many are illustrated with RF cameras, usually Leicas, but I would hesitate to place myself among the masters of landscape photography.

    Besides, once a repro house has finished with it, you may have some difficulty in telling a good picture from a bad one. Publishing is a bit like mini-lab printing: a lot more depends on the quality of the printing than on the quality of the original picture.

    Cheers,

    Roger

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