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  1. #11
    ann
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    i agree, he was trying to avoid naming names. I understand you would like to fill in the blanks, i am just suggesting that the day books are about so m uch more than the women.
    http://www.aclancyphotography.com

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ann
    i agree, he was trying to avoid naming names. I understand you would like to fill in the blanks, i am just suggesting that the day books are about so m uch more than the women.
    Oh, I 100% agree. I was really just responding to the comment about the cryptic first letters.
    With at least two biographies of such great but second tier photographers as Evans, Arbus, Bourke-White and many others, it's a shame that there's not a really good one of Weston, Strand, or Cartier-Bresson. (Lord knows how many there are of Steiglitz, Stiechen, and Adams).

  3. #13
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    I am reading the Day Books now, about 1/3 through. Edward mentions that Brett as a late teen ager started writing a day book. I haven't seen mention of that elsewhere. Can anyone add any information to that?

    John Powers

  4. #14
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    I had every Weston book I could afford. To get the complete picture of EW I recomend reading the book by Charis, "Through another lens" . The Tina Modotti Biography was not my cup of tea and to honest I never finished it, could not get used to the authors style. "Through another lens" provides info on EW's day to day life, and their relationship and ultimate break up.

  5. #15
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    Sam,
    I agree totally with what you said. I have been buying what I could afford for years, but I like Charis's. I also have not finished reading The Tina Modotti
    bio. Definitely not my cup of tea either.

    Charlie........................

    Would love to have the big Weston book, but alas it is beyond my means!

  6. #16

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    Hi Charles. The pictures are too small to enjoy in the big one, and there's insufficient captioning information. There are several others, but none of them seem to be very complete. Perhaps the second edition of the Maddow is the best compromise (unfortunately, I have the first edition), the Tashin is good, and while Lodima's has excellent reproductions the source of their pictures is limited to a single private collection. Learning about Weston seems a little like the old joke about the blind men describing an elephant.

  7. #17
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    I`ll stick with his images!
    I pass the ladies, gay affairs, depressions and so on.

    Hmmmmm, good time to put my eyes on " ...a legacy" once again.

    Cheers

    André

  8. #18
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Bill,
    I don't have either of the Maddow editions, so haven't read them. I guess I am much like Andre, I would like to know lots more about the images and how they were created, but will definitely by pass on a play by play account of E W's life style.


    Charlie........................................... ....

  9. #19

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    The best resource on Edward Weston is the "Big Book" as you call it. For those not familiar, the title is, "Edward Weston: Photographs from the Collection of the Center For Creative Photography," by Dr. Amy Conger. In addition to the thumbnail images of all the print holding in the center, Dr. Conger also wrote a very good biography, although not book-length by any measure. Plus with each image thumbnail Dr. Conger documents important facts about the photograph and how it relates to Edward's life.
    Another excellent book is "Edward Weston: Forms of Passion." It has an excellent biography section of each period of Edward's career, and a critical analysis of his work. Included in the book are 320 duotone images from all periods of Edward's creative life. For many this might be the best book to own.
    As someone who has read every book in print on Edward; studied under Cole Weston for several years to learned first-hand about his father; and having done original research with the Weston archive at the Center For Creative Photography, no one book or resource tells it all. The Edward Weston I have come to know evolved over several decades of study. I have come to appreciate more than the photographer. I have come to appreciate the man. He was an American original in every sense of the word. He lived a life few of us can fathom. And the man I have come to know, would have been a great man even if he never picked up a camera.
    To answer a few other questions listed in this thread, Brett kept a Daybook for a very shot time in Mexico. Once he was introduced to the camera and photography he was a visual thinker and wrote very little. Even in the books he published of his work during his lifetime, Brett let the images tell the story, not words.
    Charis' book on Edward, although a good one, and one I enjoyed immensely, only reflects on the period of his life they were together. So one doesn't get a complete picture of the man. Charis' book omits completely three important periods of his career. His world renowned work in pictorialism; his work in Mexico; and his post-Mexico period that yielded some of his strongest work: nudes, shells and vegetables. It is my observation that Edward could have quit photography in 1920, 1927 or 1930 and would still have been a giant in the history of photography.
    And as for 50 years having passed since Edward's death, it is not too late for a biography to be written. The resources and information on Edward at the CCP have barely been tapped. The correspondence alone could yield untold stories and a new look at the life and work of this man. Plus with time comes perspective. I hope someone takes up the challenge.

  10. #20
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    Thank you PhotoHistorian for those details.
    Unfortunately as the cliché goes, if you have to ask, you probably can’t afford it.

    Edward Weston: Photographs from the Collection of the Center For Creative Photography," by Dr. Amy Conger
    Amazon used $1,899.00
    eBay Buy it now $1495
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Edward-Weston-Ph...QQcmdZViewItem

    Thankfully I have the "Edward Weston: Forms of Passion". It was on display at the Dayton Art Institute's Weston show two years ago as a book they suggested.

    John Powers

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