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  1. #21
    Andy K's Avatar
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    I watched and really enjoyed it!

    One day I'll have to make a room into a camera obscura as in the opening scenes, (although I wasn't inspired by the artsy fartsy editing in that section).
    Fox-Talbot's paper negatives versus the one off Daguerrotypes. Seeing a Daguerrotype being made has made me want one to hang on the wall!
    The section on 'the Kodak fiends' and their round prints was fascinating. Then there were the murder scene photos from NY City Police Department in the early 20th century, their poor homes looking 'like the tombs of the pharoahs', shot straight down, showing the tripod legs and the detectives feet. Brilliant!
    The most interesting for me was the part on 'vernacular' photographers, amateurs. I would love to browse through those albums of Jacques Henri Latigue!

    All in all this looks like being a superb series... although I have a feeling I might be less interested in the final part.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  2. #22
    Fintan's Avatar
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    Very enjoyable, well done to the BBC.

    Did they commission it or did it come from another source?

  3. #23
    Matt5791's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    I watched and really enjoyed it!

    One day I'll have to make a room into a camera obscura as in the opening scenes, (although I wasn't inspired by the artsy fartsy editing in that section).
    Fox-Talbot's paper negatives versus the one off Daguerrotypes. Seeing a Daguerrotype being made has made me want one to hang on the wall!
    The section on 'the Kodak fiends' and their round prints was fascinating. Then there were the murder scene photos from NY City Police Department in the early 20th century, their poor homes looking 'like the tombs of the pharoahs', shot straight down, showing the tripod legs and the detectives feet. Brilliant!
    The most interesting for me was the part on 'vernacular' photographers, amateurs. I would love to browse through those albums of Jacques Henri Latigue!

    All in all this looks like being a superb series... although I have a feeling I might be less interested in the final part.
    To be fair, I thing the "Arty editing" in the camera obscura bit was as a result of shooting in what must have been very low light - they mush have had the camera in some sort of night mode / long shutter.

    All in all very interesting - love the way the tripod legs intrude into the NY Police photorgaphs.

  4. #24
    matti's Avatar
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    Do they send their stuff on the web as well? I didn't find anything on that address, so I guess not.

    /matti

  5. #25

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    There seem to be three threads on this subject now!
    Here's the other one with most replies
    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum45/4...tml#post537205

  6. #26
    Steve S's Avatar
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    Yes, I too watched with great interest. The camera obscura room was excellent. Although I have often read about this I had never seen it done in practise and I would love to have a go at it. All you need it seems is a good supply of black bin bags and some parcel tape.
    Programs like this can only skim the surface in the time available and always seem to leave me wanting more. However anything that raises public awareness of the medium and its principles and history can only be for the good. All told it looks very promising and well done BBC.
    In a similar vein I recently emailed the producers of the Antiques Roadshow to ask why historic photographic apparatus and ephemera have had such a poor showing on the programme over the years, considering its importance in the context of the 19th and 20th century. Is that people do not bring items to them? Is it that the program makers do not consider photographic history to be of a wide enough appeal? While they did not answer these questions directly they did reply with a very nice email about a Nikon collection which
    was brought for the program to be screened on the 23rd December. They could not confirm whether or not it would make the final cut for the program but maybe its worth tuning in just to see if and how they handle it.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt5791 View Post
    Found it really interesting - I think it is repreated in a couple of days .
    It's repeated sooner than that - I caught it at 00.20 last night. Haven't watched it yet but I recorded it on my analogue VHS recorder.

    Steve

  8. #28
    Steve S's Avatar
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    Apologies if you have seen this entry in the other thread too.
    Yes, I too watched with great interest. The camera obscura room was excellent. Although I have often read about this I had never seen it done in practise and I would love to have a go at it. All you need it seems is a good supply of black bin bags and some parcel tape.
    Programmes like this can only skim the surface in the time available and always seem to leave me wanting more. However anything that raises public awareness of the medium and its principles and history can only be for the good. All told it looks very promising and well done BBC.
    In a similar vein I recently emailed the producers of the Antiques Roadshow to ask why historic photographic apparatus and ephemera have had such a poor showing on the programme over the years, considering its importance in the context of the 19th and 20th century. Is that people do not bring items to them? Is it that the programme makers do not consider photographic history to be of a wide enough appeal? While they did not answer these questions directly they did reply with a very nice email about a Nikon collection which
    was brought in for the programme to be screened on the 23rd December. They could not confirm whether or not it would make the final cut for the programme but maybe it's worth tuning in just to see if and how they handle it.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt5791 View Post
    All in all very interesting - love the way the tripod legs intrude into the NY Police photorgaphs.
    Yes, and the detectives' feet... Those pictures were amazing - if a little gruesome.

  10. #30
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    I'm kind of confused by the "circular" kodak pictures they showed. I'm sure those were only matted that way, which seemed unusual. They did show some, what looked like contact prints to me, brownie prints. They're rectangular not circular and the vignetting isn't noticeable on them. I print from negatives made in my Brownie No.2 Model E and Model F cameras and they're rather good for sometime marketed as a toy.

    I also got confused by their dating and use of the word "first photograph" for lots of different things but that's probably just me being thick.

    edit: Having now looked it up on the brownie camera website, the first brownie and Brownie No.1 were square format (2 1/4") and the Brownie No. 2 has that rectangular, 8 to a roll format. So what I recognised as a brownie print was probably from a brownie no.2 like what I use still. Those shutters still work!!
    Last edited by Akki14; 10-26-2007 at 05:10 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarifying confusion.
    ~Heather
    oooh shiny!
    http://www.stargazy.org/

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