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  1. #1

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    Paris in the Spring

    I'm off to Paris in early April (for the day only!).

    Can anyone recommend any 'must-see' photography exhibitions that will be on the w/e 5/6th within reasonably easy reach of the Gard du Nord ?

  2. #2

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    http://www.mep-fr.org/us/default_test_ok.htm
    and
    http://www.arts-programme.com/musee.php?code=348

    That is the place I always go when I am i Paris......Just take metro ...Ligne 7 to Pont Marie....from Gard du Est.....
    erik hartmann
    my very humble AP-Gallery:
    http://nehartmann.dk/eh-analog/

  3. #3

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    Thanks for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Hartmann View Post
    http://www.mep-fr.org/us/default_test_ok.htm
    and
    http://www.arts-programme.com/musee.php?code=348

    That is the place I always go when I am i Paris......Just take metro ...Ligne 7 to Pont Marie....from Gard du Est.....

  4. #4
    Trask's Avatar
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    When you land at the airport, go to a magazine kiosk and buy a copy of Pariscope for 40 Euro cents. I has listings for all museums and galleries, etc. You just missed the Shoji Ueda and Boubat exhibitions at the MEP -- I really liked the Ueda photographs.

    FYI, there was just an article in Le Figaro recently pointing out how attendance is way up at photography exhibitions in Paris and throughout France. I've got to say, the French remained really tuned in to photography in a way that I'm told my fellow Americans are not. Hard for me to say, as I haven't lived in the States since 1996. Time to head home, someday.

  5. #5
    Christopher Nisperos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trask View Post
    . . . there was just an article in Le Figaro recently pointing out how attendance is way up at photography exhibitions in Paris and throughout France. I've got to say, the French remained really tuned in to photography in a way that I'm told my fellow Americans are not. Hard for me to say, as I haven't lived in the States since 1996. Time to head home, someday.
    Good point. I think that the cultivated segment of the French public-at-large (not trying to be snobbish.. I just mean "those people susceptible to appreciate photography in the first place") are just beginning to climb the learning curve, as compared with the same public in the U.S. Don't forget that in France —not so long ago—, photography as Art would have been a ridiculous concept. Photography was widely considered to be just a way to document things

    Jean Dieuzaide once told me about a framed exhibition he helped Robert Doisneau hang in the 1950's. The frames caused a small scandal! He said, "Prints were viewed as a sort a glorified Xerox which didn't merit being place in a frame, for God's sake" (my paraphrased translation)

    Obviously —and fortunately— things are changing quickly. Most photography fans in France probably now know that "Ansel" is not Gretel's boyfriend, or that Weston isn't just a brand of shoes (these are actual answers once given to me!). Again, it's not my intention to insult the French. These are just my observations. Afterall, the same could probably be said of the American public-at-large when it comes to certain art forms which are readily appreciated in France (I dunno —say, painting? I'd guess that many educated Americans couldn't tell you —right off— which painting was a Courbet as opposed to a Degas. I know that I couldn't!).

    Anyway, just my two centimes. Back on track for the posted question: also check out http://www.paris.fr/portail/english/...t?page_id=8118 ... and
    http://www.whatsonwhen.com (for Paris)

    Lastly, for some inside information, just today I received an email about a group show happening during your visit. (http://jmmilliere.free.fr/Grains2/accueil.php?lang=en) It includes work by my friend, Sue Rynski, who photographed the rock scene in Detroit in the early 1970's, so there are rare shots of a young Iggy Pop and Patty Smith.

    If you have time left for coffee or a glass of wine in a neat, "Belle Epoque" café, check out the Café Charbon, 109 rue Oberkampf in the 11th arrondissement (metro: rue Saint Maur). Bow your head as you pass the nearby Place de la République ... it's steps away from where Daquerre's lab used to be located!

    Amuse-toi bien! (and bring a coat)

    Christopher

    .. .. ..
    Last edited by Christopher Nisperos; 03-30-2008 at 01:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #6
    BWKate's Avatar
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    Have an awesome day Cate! I want to hear about when you come back.

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    SuzanneR's Avatar
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    Yes, Cate... I'm looking forward to a full report of your day!

  8. #8

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    Thanks all - will absorb the good info. I too was sorry to see I'd missed the exhibitions at the MEP - I wasn't in control of the timing of this, otherwise I would have chosen the exhibitions first and then the date! I'm not totally in control of the itinerary either but will see what I can do (well, I can be quite strong-willed and we can always separate! )
    I will try to remember to report back on what I've seen.

  9. #9

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    A very quick update on this, no great report...

    In the end I saw the Louise Bourgeois exhibition at the Pompidou Centre : http://www.centrepompidou.fr/Pompido...ionM=2.1.1&L=2

    Also the Man Ray exhibition L'Atelier Man Ray ('Man Ray's Studio' - subtitled 'unconcerned but not indifferent') at the Pinacotèque de Paris. http://www.pinacotheque.com/site/expo2.fr.html

    I've wanted to see more of Louise Bourgeois' work for some time, and this is a comprehensive retrospective, as well as a show-case for her recently completed large canvas works.

    She is now aged 96, and by virtue of that fact alone quite an inspiration. If my memory is correct (I read this some years back, I'm 99.9% certain it was about her - who else could it have been?) when asked at age 90 or so why she kept working so vigorously, she replied that she worked in order to keep from dreaming about the bodies of young men. Quite cheering really.

    Her work would not be for everyone, but it is well worth seeing - sometimes sensual, sometimes disturbing, occasionally startlingly beautiful (though hers is perhaps not a conventional concept of beauty), always unique. See it if you can, while she's still with us. Some great photographs which act as her 'life line' lead you into the exhibition. The earliest pictures of her as a child show her strength of character, I think; the way she gazes steadfastly into the lens.

    The Man Ray exhibition is much smaller, good if you haven't a lot of time and /or if you're beginning to feel knackered. I've never seen original works of his before so this was wonderful. Many early works, lots of surprisingly small photos; also lithographs and ink drawings, early documents, great to have it all put in context. I liked seeing the Polaroids (in the light of current climate).

    Both very much recommended. I'm now planning my next trip to Paris. I last went 10 years ago and will never let such a long time pass before I go again. The eurostar is faster than it was then but has decamped away from Waterloo to St. Pancras Very annoying for those south of the river who were briefly allowed to feel really superior

    edited to mention:

    Also worth a visit, closer to home: http://www.tate.org.uk/modern/exhibi...manraypicabia/
    Last edited by catem; 04-12-2008 at 02:02 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
    delphine's Avatar
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    Thank you for reporting back.

    I too I am nostalgic of the Waterloo eurostar station, and I don't live south of the river. I always thought it hilarious that the French would arrive/leave through Waterloo.

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