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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Osgood View Post
    Great. I'd like to make the 11AM opening if you can swing it.
    Bruce,

    I can't make it until 1:00pm. My cell is 917-940-7510. Hope to see you there.

    Pete

  2. #12
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roodpe View Post
    Bruce,

    I can't make it until 1:00pm. My cell is 917-940-7510. Hope to see you there.

    Pete

    I expect to still be their then and will keep a weary eye out for you.
    Bruce Osgood
    Chinese proverb
    "Print with #3.5 and burn with #1.5." B.J. Confucius
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/camclicker/

  3. #13
    jovo's Avatar
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    Besides having the pleasure of seeing Bruce again at the end of my time at AIPAD, I also enjoyed the pleasure of seeing more photographs than anyone can possible absorb in one day.

    I lost the pencil I had hoped to jot notes on, but my casual survey of the show revealed that monolithic color work has not taken over the world. Yes, there were some huge prints both color and monochrome (Chip Hooper's stuff was H U G E!!), but there was vastly more interesting work of reasonable scale. Black and white isn't dead either....it's thriving and was present in abundance.

    There were some remarkable and unusual photographs to be seen. Robert Glenn Ketchum makes wonderful color prints (and is a formidable advocate for ecological sanity), but also has his work "translated" into large silk textiles that are mounted in free standing wooden frames. There were some contemporary daguerreotypes that were mounted in a box-like setting by Patrick Bailly-Maitre-Grand that were intriguing. There were also some vintage daguerreotypes along with beautifully preserved antique photographs of many authors as is typical in these shows. My favorite was a portrait of Abraham Lincoln taken by a mammoth camera in the 1860's and printed in the 1890's that was as vivid as any that could be made today. It was, I think an 11x14 or larger contact print in superb condition. For a change, many of the large color works I saw (or at least the ones I paid attention to) were NOT ironic, nor celebrations of the banal and the repugnant, nor desaturated and "anti-Velvia" artifacts. Though, in reviewing the catalog, it's apparent that there were some of the aforementioned that I "missed". And MAS and Paula Chamlee have turned some kind of corner with their photography. It was remarkable that there were any to be seen in the first place since they didn't used to sell through dealers, but now they're making large platinum prints on (in Chamlee's case) Japanese rice paper....and I can't believe I'm writing this...with a digi step in there someplace. I'm not sure of the details, but it was like hearing a rabbi pray to Jesus.

    As to matting and framing, anything goes! Though black, wood frames still dominate, white (John Szarkowski, Michael Kenna etc.) frames made a strong showing as well. There were platinum color metal, aluminum, silver, brown wood, and no-frame frames that generally complimented the work they embraced. (Only three gold colored metal frames of one photographer did I see, and they were a terrible choice for his work.) I got no sense of a dominant mat style. For instance, while Szarkowski's prints were corner mounted in mats that covered their edges, Kenna's dry-mounted prints were float mounted with a large "moat" around them. If one came to the show hoping to be educated in the "best" way to present one's work, the only lesson to learn was to make your work look good....anyway you choose to.

    And now my favorites! Kenna's, and Szarkowski's photographs of course. They were wonderful. A Koichira Kurita print I'd never seen before blew me away (I love all the work of his I've ever seen anyway). Some larger platinum prints of Ryuijie were stunning. I sifted through a group of Rolf Horne's photographs that I'd never seen in person before. Bill Schwab's portfolio was wonderful as always (and it was nice to speak to Thomas Halsted...nice guy). And there must be a number of others I'll wake up tonight remembering that I'm sure I'm omitting, but I'm tired and ......zzzzzzz. :rolleyes:

    If you've taken the time to read all this, make the effort to get yourself to an AIPAD show next year. I think there are two other American locations that host them, but I'm not sure where or when they're held. If AIPAD were chocolate, I'd have gained 35 pounds today. Since it isn't, it's a healthy fix for your photography habit!
    Last edited by jovo; 04-13-2008 at 08:23 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: spelink and gramur
    John Voss

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  4. #14
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb View Post
    Lots of B&W shown, I thought. I was mainly looking at albumen prints, and there were certainly enough to keep me occupied for most of the day. The most impressive was a print by Bisson Fréres of Alyscamps, Arles dated 1857--beautiful tones and sharp figures incorporated into what was otherwise an architectural composition.
    What a beautiful print that was and how amazing that after more than 150 years, we cannot produce images with all our technology that are any more beautiful.

    I was strolling down that aisle with Paul Paletti, who was on a buying binge and that picture stopped us dead in our tracks. The price ($40K) took a little wind out of his sails. However, they had some other Frére stuff hanging in their room in the back for much less money. Did you see those? Maybe not quite so exquisite, but all gorgeous nonetheless.

    Paul says that when he was in school at UNM the saying was, "If you can't make it good, make it small and dark". Now the bon mot seems to be "If you can't make it good, make it big and in color". That certainly seemed to be the theme at this year's AIPAD.

    However, if one took the time to really look, there was much timeless art to be seen. I was especially happy to see so many fine pieces by my beloved Frederick Sommer.

  5. #15
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    I was strolling down that aisle with Paul Paletti, who was on a buying binge and that picture stopped us dead in our tracks. The price ($40K) took a little wind out of his sails. However, they had some other Frére stuff hanging in their room in the back for much less money. Did you see those? Maybe not quite so exquisite, but all gorgeous nonetheless.
    Yes, I looked through four folios of albumen prints in the back, since they had such a nice selection and weren't too busy, so they didn't mind spending time with me.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  6. #16
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    My earlier post did not make it thru so I will try again...

    The "Bisson Fréres of Alyscamps, Arles dated 1857" was the Queen of the Show for me. It caught my eye from a distance and stopped me dead in place. And as John said, the Lincoln portrait was another highlight.

    Anybody who suggests photography is dead or dying ought to get out more. The AIPAD show is proof photography is alive and doing well in the world.

    And it is selling. While a lot of pictures did not have a price tag, of the ones that did the least expensive was $900 to a high of over $50K. there were also a lot with red dots indicating SOLD. One dealer even covered his sold pictures with a cloth so they could not be seen. What is that about?

    The bottom line for me remains there is not one way to do photography. If it feels right then do it. There will always be someone more successful than me and someone less successful. Somewhere in the world is the worst photographer and it ain't me.

    Bruce Osgood
    Chinese proverb
    "Print with #3.5 and burn with #1.5." B.J. Confucius
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/camclicker/

  7. #17
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Osgood View Post
    One dealer even covered his sold pictures with a cloth so they could not be seen. What is that about?
    Were they very early prints, like pre-1850? Those are often displayed with a cloth over them to reduce exposure to light. You can lift the cloth to look at them. I've seen this at the Art Institute of Chicago, and a few of the prints at Serge Plantureux (which was showing the Bisson work) in the back were displayed this way.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #18
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
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    Well David, I don't know what was under the cloth. I wasn't about to lift it up and maybe create some kind of scene. But it is a good point you make.

    It was not the same dealer as the Bisson works.
    Bruce Osgood
    Chinese proverb
    "Print with #3.5 and burn with #1.5." B.J. Confucius
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/camclicker/

  9. #19
    bill schwab's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jovo View Post
    ...nice to speak to Thomas Halsted...
    Thanks for taking a look John! I talked to Tom a couple times and he was wondering where a guy like me met so many nice people. Also said he saw Monty, Paul, etc. I hate to miss it and wish I could have been there. Apparently it was a good sales year for all too. Always good news, especially in this economy.

    Bill

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