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  1. #61
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    I'm in the exact same boat. Two days ago I was working on a server issue at the office until 2am , so I am not liking digital at the moment!
    The thought of spending this coming weekend photoshopping images on my pc for hours?... not possible without getting severely nauseous. Photography unplugged is all I need to keep sane sometimes
    You're SANE?! :o

    I'm impressed; you hide it very well!



    My dealings tend to be around the software support side; when it hits the fan, I'm the chap who sweeps it up, puts it in a bag and sells it as fertiliser!

    And yes, I'm in dire need of some darkroom time... ...or I'll start to dribble. Again.
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  2. #62
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    I was in the UK last week and happened to pick up a copy of Amateur Photographer (issue 17th July) in which Roger Hicks in his article Silver Tenacity makes a few interesting observations. Some quotes:Some photography colleges (in the US) ripped out their traditional wet darkrooms and replaced them with 'digital editing suites'. The trouble was that students voted with their feet (and their dollars)....I know of at least two US photography schools that have reinstated their wet darkrooms, at no little expense, and seen the students return afterwards....Do we see a trend here? I think we do....
    Roger Hicks is not opposed to digital, far from it but he likes trad.photography for two reasons:1) the quality of the silver halide print and 2) the wet darkroom is a deliverance from yet more time spent in front of the computer.
    Another observation: darkroom work -especially black & white- is to become the ultimate alternative process.....Film and paper will be available for many decades to come.
    So: enough reasons to be cheerful, I'd say.

    Hans
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

  3. #63
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    I'm very new to photography, but have to stick up a bit for digital here!(Runs for cover!)
    If it wasn't for my cheap digital camera (Digimaster Mouse 610) I wouldn't have even tried analogue photography.(Some would claim that this just proves the case AGAINST digital!!)
    I had never used a camera until February this year when I bought my digicam, and soon found that I was having a great time.
    The results were far better than I deserved, but that was the problem. I found that there was nothing to it. Point....Beep....Nice image! No effort = no value.
    Nothing worthwhile is easy.
    Less than 3 months later I had bought an old 35mm.
    I find that using my SLR is far more rewarding. The pictures are terrible in comparrison, but I find it so much more satisfying. Everything on the camera has to be manually set...If I get a good picture, I know it was ME that got it....not some microchip working out the perfect balances.
    I'm sure that there are alot of digital users out there who have the utmost respect for the analogue process, but you don't hear about them too often, ~only the digiheads who scream 'DIGITAL IS BEST' in their arrogance at the first opportunity!
    When I signed up on APUG a couple of weeks ago, I found an online community of talented, friendly, helpful and enthusiastic people, and hoped that I had left the elitism behind on other sites.

  4. #64
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    It seems that many (not all!) of you that prefer to work in traditional photography have to work with computers--the traditional is a release from the monitor so to speak. Just curious how many of you work with computers everyday.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

    blog
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  5. #65
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Only in so much as it is a medium with which to research photography, view others' work and show those shots I feel are worth showing.
    Other than that the computer is pretty much just another piece of tech sitting in the corner of my living room.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  6. #66

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    Jeremy

    I spend 85% of my working day in front of one. The other 15% is in meetings about how to configure them for other people to sit in front of them.

    Phill
    It is not tradition that secures the survival of our craft, its the craft that secures the survival of our traditions.

  7. #67
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    I spend 3 days a week doing digital imaging, networking, and general IS. I spend the rest of the time split between web dev, and photography. I just finished 6 grueling weeks filming, editing and producing a 15 min promotional DVD.

    I am way too intimate with computers, but need them to pay the bills. My once perfect if not exceptional eye sight is quickly going down the tubes. As soon as my wife finishes her degrees (three more years -- touch wood) and gets a job I hope to switch to photography full time.

    I started working with computers professionally in the mid 80's. The promise they held for an artist was exhilarating. after 20 years of progress, with equal doses of gratification and manipulation as administered by the hardware and software companies has left me very cynical. I am fully from Missouri when it comes to all things computers.

    *

  8. #68

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    I really don't spend that much time with a computer now. Several years ago I worked for a company marketing very special meteorlogical and remote sensing workstations and software. Now my current job only requires basic use.

    I think one reason I love traditional methods and a darkroom is it is comparable to woodworking, or metalworking or even gardening. While a wood worker or furniture maker has access to very high end power tools and aids, it still comes down to working with the raw materials, doing most of the detail work and construction by hand. If anyone here grew up around people who did woodworking you know what a feeling you get to walk into a shop and smell the different wood being worked, the varnish and stains. A darkroom provides a link that I think is indispensible to creativity. The human connection between materials and a final product through ones hands and touch. Think of all the tactile sensations one experiences shooting, developing, printing and finishing. They become so ingrained in us that we don't really notice them unless they are taken away. Like a gardner working rich soil with the hands, the wordworker checking contours and finishes, the metalworker and his tools, the smell or hot metal and acetylene. The stone mason or sculpture with the the feel of the hammer and chisel in his hands the smell from the dust and chips as he works his stone.

    Where do you get this from digital? The smell of overheating circuit boards?
    The scent of ink wafting from the paper? The touch of the mouse and the keyboard?

    Maybe in the final analysis it really is not about which process makes the best prints or is the more creative. Maybe it is about how we are wired. Some of us gravitiate towards a more sensual experience of traditional. Others a more calcualted mathematical digital form. We can discuss alll we want but our makeups may decide what we do for us.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  9. #69

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    Kaishowing said he "hoped that [he] had left the elitism behind on other sites." I think you might have swapped digital elitism for analog elitism in some cases, but generally, the people here are indeed well behaved.

    The only problem is, there are occasional threads with names like "Film rules, Digi Drools" and you are bound to find animosity bubbling just below the surface. Why are people here so keen on bashing the digital side? I don't know, and I don't really understand it. But of course, I always bite and respond, having a foot in both puddles. If people stop antagonising the digital shooters, they won't feel forced to respond defensively/aggressively. This is APUG, after-all.

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  10. #70

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    It is the final result that counts. Of course full disclosure must accompany such result otherwise we should question the motives.
    Francesco

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