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  1. #51
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    Though some of his work is medium format, much of the landscape work is 4x5 in James Evans' book Big Bend Pictures. Some great stuff (and some I'm not too fond of) and a really nice guy (met him at the gallery opening here in Dallas).
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

    blog
    website

  2. #52
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John McCallum
    My copy of Bruce Barnbaum's Tone Poems 1 arrived this morning.
    The website makes this book seem quite impressive. I may order it myself. But, it will have to wait. I just ordered a copy of Dykinga's latest book "Arizona".
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #53
    BradS's Avatar
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    "The Man Who Shot Garbo" by Clarence Sinclair Bull

  4. #54
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp80874
    Lois came from her teaching job at Princeton for three days on a grant last March. She spoke to a large audience at the Meyers Art school about her work and gave a two day introductory platinum printing workshop for 12 students. I was lucky enough to win a seat there. At several points she showed her work including the original platinum photos used for the book "China"
    About 10 years ago I had a contracting assignment at the USPS Headquarters (back in the days of "Carvin' Marvin" Runyon), which is about 300 yards from the main entrance courtyard at the Smithsonian. Lois Connor had a solo exhibition up at the Sackler Gallery of her China photos and I wandered in there one day on my lunch hour. I went back every day for weeks. I haven't seen any better platinum work from a living photographer. I'm sure that some of them were the same ones you saw.

    The troglodytes who review art for the Washington Post had to give her credit for fine technical execution, but said that ultimately the show was sterile because there were no people in the pictures. I haven't read an art column in the Post since.
    Jim

  5. #55

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    Anything by

    Michael Kenna
    Brandt
    Emmett Gowin
    Le Gray

  6. #56
    Shmoo's Avatar
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    Although he's more of a photographer of the human condition, Sebastiao Salgado has some phenomenal landscapes in his book, Migrations. Amazing stuff...

  7. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shmoo
    Although he's more of a photographer of the human condition, Sebastiao Salgado has some phenomenal landscapes in his book, Migrations. Amazing stuff...
    Completely agree. That and I might also add his book 'Workers' are superb.

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3
    The troglodytes who review art for the Washington Post had to give her credit for fine technical execution, but said that ultimately the show was sterile because there were no people in the pictures. I haven't read an art column in the Post since.
    Can't top the Trogs. Nothing dumber than dumb. I'm guessing Lois focused on landscape to have a single subject exhibit. The landscapes are simply wonderful but in her book "China", people and their lives are the subject of many of her pictures.

    She commented that as a blonde Caucasian woman, on a bicycle carrying a banquet Deardorff and tripod, up and down the mountains of a remote province in China, she had a little trouble being inconspicuous. Every time she stopped to set up a picture there might be one or two people in the picture and 70-100 behind her silently staring at her every movement.

    I hope to see more of her work.

    John Powers

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