Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,338   Posts: 1,537,687   Online: 929
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    david b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    None of your business
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,034
    Images
    30

    Shutterbug Magazine August 2004 Issue

    The august 2004 issue of shutterbug has a very interesting letter from the editor and one that I encourage everyone to read (see page 8).

    The first part of the letter says that a major photo school is closing down its darkroom and going all digital.

    The second part of the letter says that "art shows are increasingly rejecting photographic prints made with ink jet, saying they are mere copies".

    I find this quite interesting. The art school is saying no to traditional printing but the art show is saying no to digital printing.

    So if you've read this article, please let us know what you think.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,645
    Here's the biased article Shutterbug - George Schaub. Back when I was doing digital prints, I used his book on B&W digi darkroom - his specialty. Shutterbug relies on ads from an industry that is going digital. So, its only natural that he/they bemoan the trend of art fair directors & gallery curators rejecting digi prints.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  3. #3
    dr bob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Annapolis, Md
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    871
    Images
    14
    I have said this somewhere before, but very recently a Gallery owner told me his clients bought my photographs because, "They were the only traditional prints they could find lately." From this I gather that collection of ink jet prints is not in the art "mainstream" yet. But it will come as soon as they (the collectors) figure that there are two distinct art forms involved.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  4. #4
    david b's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    None of your business
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    4,034
    Images
    30
    To be fair, George is also upset that the school is ditching the chemical darkroom.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,645
    The bias shows in the following statement:
    This is, to me, a fairly ignorant stance on the part of art committees, but one that exists nonetheless. It fails to recognize that making color prints by digital means is no more or less a copying technique than working from a negative. It is still in how the print is made, and how the artist and craftsperson works the image that makes it unique. One could make dozens of prints from a negative as easily as one could from a scan.
    I'm not sure what darkroom printing method he is thinking of that is comparable in ease to loading a printer & pushing a GUI button. I would suspect that the uniqueness of each traditional print is main reason why collectors buy traditional prints & reject digi prints as being copies.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  6. #6
    galyons's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    273
    Images
    2
    Hi All,
    Well...my perspective is that the article is fairly well balanced. Even more so, considering the source. Let's not forget how long that it took for silver gelatin printing to be considered an art form. Galleries want something that sells...silver gelatin prints do, photographs don't! Giclee may where inkjet won't? "The fickle politics of art!"

    Don't shoot the "bearer of tidings!

    Cheers,
    Geary

  7. #7
    bjorke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    SF & Surrounding Planet
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,032
    Images
    20
    Personally, I think that skills can travel both ways -- I feel my understanding of digital printing was enhanced by darkroom experience, but have also found that digital printing experience has influenced my darkroom printing (especially in my pre-visualizations of a wide range of exposure and contrast effects, which I got used to doing rapidly and cheaply via Photoshop etc).

    Galleries, however, are not in the business of selling (or defining, save as a marketing ploy) "art." They are in the business of selling art objects — that is, objects which have been declared "artistic." Though we all know that digital silver prints are a reality, the art-buying public generally ignores that sort of thing. A wet print, in their minds, will never be the same as a pic that someone might have grabbed off a web page.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
    KBPhotoRantPhotoPermitAPUG flickr Robot

  8. #8
    jovo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,085
    Images
    190
    I think Schaub's editorial is quite fair and reasonable. Shutterbug is, to me at least, often markedly shrill in it's endorsement of digital products and processes. Some of those who write for that magazine, in fact, were the "ranting pixelidiots" I was referring to on another thread that Les took such exception to (certainly not him, as he's always been well balanced and fair in his views.). I've been disappointed in some of Schaub's prior editorials as well, when he's not had the courage to make a pointed critisism of digital matters when the thrust of the article he was writing would have made such a statement seem the logical endpoint of his thesis. But, in the case cited here, he's making a reasoned argument on behalf of both digital and traditional issues. Now, if he would have the editorial sack to continue to feature articles on traditional matters 'above the fold' instead of relegating a few column inches to Frances Schultz at the back of the magazine, perhaps Shutterbug would help retain a balance between the two art forms and help to head off the derailing of film with the supercilliousness it's being treated with now.
    John Voss

    My Blog

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    4,530
    This is the quote I liked the most, clearly not balanced or fair IMO:

    "One could make dozens of prints from a negative as easily as one could from a scan. Indeed, if archival quality is the issue one could also argue that ink jet prints can be made that last as long, or longer, than dye prints from color negatives."

    Not a good print IMO. OTOH, I never looked at Shutterbug for informed or balanced opinions, I liked reading the ads...

  10. #10
    clogz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rotterdam, The Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,837
    Images
    114
    In another thread I talked about what Roger Hicks wrote about US photo schools doing away with their darkrooms. The students left and darkroom will be reinstated again. Source:Amateur Photographer (UK) 17th July 2004 issue.
    Hans
    Last edited by clogz; 08-01-2004 at 04:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Digital is best taken with a grain of silver.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin