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  1. #1
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Hand held VS in camera meters.

    Please bear with me I've only been doing this photography thing for 52 years now.

    I have a simple question:
    I have a Gossen Digisix which reads smack on, with a friends Minolta (something or other) meter as well as my Gossen luna Pro etc.
    taking a reflected light reading from a 18% grey card or general light reading.

    AS well I have a Nikon F2, F3HP, a Nikon F4 and a Hasselblad with a PME 5 meter. All these cameras read better than 1/3 stop of one another
    from a 18% grey card or general light reading.

    My camera meters read almost exactly 1 stop lower than the handheld light meters from the same scene.

    Now what?
    Last edited by Paul Goutiere; 06-05-2012 at 12:17 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Did you remember to take your filters off your lenses? haha =]

    Many cameras take a center weighted reading that sometimes includes a larger part of the bottom of the frame than the top. Intended to give a bit more emphasis on the immediate foreground than the sky kind idea, this may be the difference between using your hand held meter which just calculates everything all evenly.

    Time to get a spot meter (they are great btw), or just dont worry. =]

  3. #3

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    For me, that's close enough.

    If you're shooting slide film, maybe you'll want to be as accurate as you can be, and that's likely the Gossen which is the most correct.

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    Like many things, you have to establish an EI with each meter. Or, just use the Gossen with everything.
    The bottom weighted thing was a Minolta feature.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  5. #5

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    when you compare the reading of the camera and the meter how exactly did you do that? What kind of target did you use? Because the cameras have different metering pattern than that of the meters.

  6. #6
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Goutiere View Post

    Now what?
    With many of my cameras I adjust the meter to it reads the way I want it. That way I don't have to have tape notes all over indicating which EI for which camera.

  7. #7
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran View Post
    when you compare the reading of the camera and the meter how exactly did you do that? What kind of target did you use? Because the cameras have different metering pattern than that of the meters.
    I used a 18% grey card in daylight.

    I read the light from the gray card first with the handheld meter, then with the camera meter.

    Since all my Nikon F3HP and Nikon F4S meters read exactly the same I assumed they were accurate. When I compare these meters with my F2 and FE meters
    as well as the exposure they are close ( with the F2 meter being reading 1/3 stop different.) Exposures with the F3HP and the F4S appear identical.

    When I compare the readings with the Nikons to my Hasselblad PME 5 meter the reading is identical.

    So; Nikon FE=F3HP=F4s=FE=Hassy PME5.

    Take the same reading with my handheld meters I read exactly 1 stop high.

    Could I ask someone else to perform a similar test?

    I must add, this doesn't appear to be a problem, my exposures are satisfactory and I sleep at night. I am merely curious if this is a quirk with my stuff or a general
    issue with all in camera and hand held meters.
    Last edited by Paul Goutiere; 06-05-2012 at 09:46 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    One uses and adjusts (calibrates) a handheld meter based on experience and proofing of many, many exposures and many permutations of the meter and the response of the film(s) used. For the record, I set my meter at basal calibration of +0.7 for straight shots using Velvia 50, with additional +1.5 polariser (additive compensation) with readings locked around a stored grey card read off in diffuse light (as Velvia is designed for). Obviously, an in-camera TTL/Evaluative/Partial meter has its place when speed and assurance of correct exposure is critical, but many of us prefer to put our brains to use, not allowing a camera to see things its own way. Not to say, however, that I allow my EOS 1N plenty of rope, though there are times when I do the thinking for it. Evaluative/matrix meters are Zone programmed and therefore can throw up curious mismatches to other styles of reading.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #9
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    Reflected light meters all comply with the ISO standard, using a K value in the ISO equation which has a manufacturer chosen value!

    N^2/t = LS/K, where 10.6< K < 13.4

    Incident light meters all comply with the ISO standard, using a C value in the ISO equation which has a manufacturer chosen value!

    N^2/t = ES/C, where 240 < C < 400



    The fact that any two randomly chosen meters concur on the same reading is pretty much coincidence!

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Goutiere View Post
    I used a 18% grey card in daylight.

    I read the light from the gray card first with the handheld meter, then with the camera meter.

    Since all my Nikon F3HP and Nikon F4S meters read exactly the same I assumed they were accurate. When I compare these meters with my F2 and FE meters
    as well as the exposure they are close ( with the F2 meter being reading 1/3 stop different.) Exposures with the F3HP and the F4S appear identical.

    When I compare the readings with the Nikons to my Hasselblad PME 5 meter the reading is identical.

    So; Nikon FE=F3HP=F4s=FE=Hassy PME5.

    Take the same reading with my handheld meters I read exactly 1 stop high.

    Could I ask someone else to perform a similar test?

    I must add, this doesn't appear to be a problem, my exposures are satisfactory and I sleep at night. I am merely curious if this is a quirk with my stuff or a general
    issue with all in camera and hand held meters.
    My experience is that my meters and cameras read the same.

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